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  • New Free Family Resoources!

    Tuesday, May 23, 2017

    We have some great new Family Resources on our Free Databases that might just help you in your research.

    We start with Roger Blocks’ Block and Eaton in 2009: A Family History. This 876 page document contains an exhaustive account of the Eaton and Block families in Europe, early America to modern day, with tables of unique surnames, places where family members were born, photographs and an excellent bibliography.

    Ancestors of Charles Salomon; Descendants of Charles Salomon in the 20th Century by Judith Trinklein Cunningham includes a hand-drawn family tree and the family of Charles and Martha Rahdert Salomon family of Fort Wayne.
    Eden
    Here we have a photograph of Frank Eden (1866-1961) and wife Mary (Myers). Frank was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana and became a Unitarian minister. He served churches in Kansas and Oklahoma before moving to California, where he died. We also have Alfred and Sarah Walker photographs, including the reverse sides of the photos.

    Jackie Weeden and Ruby Nelson began collaborating in 1989 and both encountered Whaley records that did not necessarily dovetail into their direct lines, but might for someone else. The nearly 1,000 family group sheets of the Weeden/Nelson Whaley Family Group Sheet Archives were forged from their diligence and generosity. Both Jackie and Ruby are now deceased, but their research lives on at The Genealogy Center’s website!

    Michael Lutz has donated seven new items to the free Family resources, starting with From Benjamin Franklin to Mary Morell Folger to Scottish Royalty to Carmen Linda Lutz which follows the line from the Folger family through the Colemans and Cathcarts to the Luce-Lutz family. Next is From Charles Martel to Charlemagne to Carmen Linda Lutz, which follows the Trowbridge-Prowse family to the Lutz family and From Colonel Israel Angell to Joel Burlingame to Carmen L. Lutz  which includes Burlingame, Hinman, Luce and Lutz families. From Eli Willard Benway to Carmen Linda Lutz covers the Benway, Ratliff and Lutz family, and From Rev. Roger Williams to a Lot of Angells to a Couple of Luce Women to Carmen Lutz (Another Angel), which covers the line from Roger Williams to the Angell family and then to the Luce-Lutz family. From Judge Bowling Green, Abraham Lincoln's Friend and Mentor to Carmen Linda Lutz connects the Green-Batchley family to the Benways, and From Mayflower Ancestors to Carmen L. Lutz connects the Cooke, Warren, Taber, Earle and Baker families into the Burlingames.

    Finally, we have two new Ewing photo albums and three additional sources in Ewing Legacy Images. Few of the photos are identified in the two photo albums. The other sources include a Memoranda book containing addresses, "Recollections of Malvern" (England), containing sketches from in and around Malvern, and the Enfield Public High School Class of 1901 graduation program from Hartford County, Connecticut.

    As always, we greatly appreciate all of these wonderful donations!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • More Free Family Bibles!

    Tuesday, May 09, 2017

    We have four new Family Bibles for your research needs!

    The copies of the Bashline-Fahler Family Bible was provided by Paul  Knieser to Pamela L. Pletcher Speis, who provided the transcription. It deals with the family of John Michal Fahler and Catherine A. Bashline, who were married in 1856. A portrait is included, which may be Catherine’s parents, Samuel and Mary Ann Beishlein.
    bashline9

    The transcription for the John and Catherine McElravy Family Bible was also contributed by Pamela L. (Pletcher) Speis, from a Bible owned by William David Neese.

    The first Pyatt and Anna (Knox) Williamson Family Bible was published in 1828, but records contained therein go back to the 1780s and forward to 1963. The Pyatt and Anna (Knox) Williamson Family Bible, published in 1847, also starts at 1789, but stops at 1956.
    williamson18472

    Thanks to all who donated these great sources!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Beautiful Books & City Architecture

    Saturday, May 06, 2017

    by Allison

    Occasionally we come across books in our collection that are unique by virtue of their age, content, beauty, or size.  Showcasing a book of interest can sometimes spark an idea or another way to look at a historical problem.  A lovely book that was recently added to our collection is Detroit is No Dry Bones: The Eternal City of the Industrial Age by Camilo Jose Vergara. 
    Allison 2
    “In the late 1970s, Camilo Jose Vergara set out to reinvigorate the tradition of critical urban photography that dates back to Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives (1890) and to adapt it to what he called “the new American ghetto.” Like Riis, he wished to combine image and text into a synthesis that would both shock and educate.” – Robert Fishman from Detroit is No Dry Bones

    The book is stunning.  It is a poignant photographic journey through Detroit that showcases the fall and more recent rising of the city.  It can show in one photograph a crumbling remnant of a building and the art of a movement to beautify the city.  The art is expression of the people of Detroit, past and present.  The juxtaposition of beauty versus ruin is both thought-provoking and indicative of a city rising. 

    Perhaps finding books like this on your ancestral city might teach you about where the city has been and where it has the potential to go.  It is a beautiful book that shows the love that people have had and still possess for Detroit.  It would be amazing to find a book that evokes such a sense of love for a city.
    Allison 1


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free databases from States Other than Indiana!

    Wednesday, May 03, 2017

    School records dominate our most recent additions to our Free Databases, so let’s start there!

    We have Gainesville High School Radiator of 1930 from Hall County, Georgia. It’s a typical annual form the time period, with individual photos of seniors and group photos for freshmen, sophomores and juniors, faculty, athletics and advertisements. A nice look at that time these young people’s lives.
    GainesvilleHS_1930_094

    The Mackenzie High School Stag, 1949, Wayne County, Michigan is another yearbook, but this one has many more photographs of activities and no individual or group photos of underclassmen.

    Buckhannon High School’s Rhododendron of 1923 from Upshur County, West Virginia not only has seniors, juniors and “sophs,” but also includes junior high as well as sports and activities.

    And the West Virginia Wesleyan College Murmurmontis of 1924 from Upshur County, West Virginia is divided into five primary sections: Administration, Classes, Organizations, Athletics, Sports and Advertisements, although there are also smaller groupings of features, including a Humor section for “those who never smile.”
    WestVirginiaWesleyan_1924_138

    There are other items besides schools though, starting with the Early History of St. Paul Lutheran Church, North Tonawanda, Niagara County, New York from 1861 to 1925, divided into chapters delineated by minister. Also included are Congregational Minutes from 1921 to 1927, compiled in 2008 with a continuation of the history for those same years.
     
    We have a large group photo of the International Association of Machinists Staff Conference Photograph, March 10-11, 1954, Chicago, Illinois. If one clicks on the photo at the database, one can enlarge sections to view the faces more clearly.
    Machinist_Union_0001
     
    And finally, we have 109 new Genealogy Tracers Memorials. The collection now has 5274 memorials consisting of 26042 images. These Memorials are terrific sources for African-American research!
     
    Thanks again to everyone who contributed. We really could not do it without you!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Diaries on Our Free Databases

    Sunday, Apr 30, 2017

    We have posted four diaries recently on our Free Family Resources pages.

    The Diary of Ichabod Borror and Madison Ford, partners, of Shadesville, Franklin County, Ohio was written by Borror as the two set out to explore the west and do some prospecting. The diary covers March 1864 to September 1865 and begins as the two travel to Illinois and form a company to share expenses and for safety to head west. This company consisted of Borror and Ford along with R.A. Bowie, Middleton, IL; J. Strader and S. Gipson of Tennessee; and A. McGowan, A.G. Thompson, S.C. Harrell, I. McParks, and A. Emerson of “Gailsburg,” IL, but that partnership dissolved and a new company made up of the two partners with Simeon and Jacob Strader,  David Winner, C. C. Horrell, William Kinkade, J.M. Parks, W.M. Crisp, A. G. Thompson, Marion McCown, Andrew Roberson, and R.A. Bowie, all of McDonough County, IL, and left for Idaho and points west to prospect. Aboard a steamship heading west, Borror notes the death of another prospector, Thomas Parker, on June 4, 1864, before arriving in Virginia City area. The company split up in August, leaving Borror and Ford to go their own way. The two worked over the winter, but by the next summer, the adventure had grown tedious, and many of the area prospectors talked of returning east. Borror and Ford agreed and they left, arriving in late September of 1865. The diary is filled with descriptions of the land and the people Borror encountered. Ichabod, see photo below, settled to farm in Franklin County, Ohio, and married in 1869, living with wife and family until his death in 1920.
    Ichabod Borror

    Dorothy Beuth was born on a farm east of German Valley, Illinois. She was the fourth child of Andrew and Mattie Dahlmeier Beuth in 1905. She was of Ostfriesian German ancestry. Her mother died when she was only 8 years old of Typhoid Pneumonia. Her oldest sister, Amanda, age 18 became the homemaker from then on. Dorothy married Earl Kappenman in 1930, and farmed in in the area. We have the Diary of Dorothy Beuth Kappenman from 1932 till 1945, and is filled with information on friends and neighbors in the Ogle County, Illinois area.

    Elizabeth Sophia Paxton was born in 1861 in Jay County, Indiana. She married William Edmundson in 1879 and they had seven children over the next fourteen years. The Mrs. William Edmundson Diary, Jay County, Indiana covers 1928 to 1932 and in it Libbie records life and the interactions within the family in the book given to her by her youngest daughter, Nila Edmundson Ervin.

    And we have the Diaries and Records of Dale and Wileta Wortman. Dale Wortman and Wileta Emery were married on March 8, 1931 in Van Wert County, Ohio. These materials include a family ledger of important events and purchases from 1931 to 1958; diaries, calendars and expense ledgers for various vacations and business trips from 1938 to 1973; a diary for the cottage in Curtis, Michigan purchased in 1946; and letters by Dale Wortman sent by Mariann Parker Laing sent to Carol Lee Wortman Moellering after the deaths of Dale and Wileta.
    Wortman_Diaries_0022

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • The Goodenow Photographs: Researching the Origins of Photos

    Thursday, Apr 27, 2017

    By Kay

    Recently we received a rather large donation full of wonderful treasures. Let me introduce you to two of these treasures: Elias and Cynthia Goodenow. How do I know these people are Elias and Cynthia? Well, I’ll tell you. Their names are on the back of a photograph. I found myself asking some questions: What kind of photograph was this and just when was it taken? Let’s look at some of the clues in front of us and arrive at some “sort of” answers. Why sort of? While it may be possible to figure out the kind of photograph we are looking at, we probably will never be able to have the exact date – only a close proximity.
    Zywock_Tin_001a
    Zywock_Tin_001b
    Now for the clues. When trying to date photographs you need to look at everything – front and back. We will start with the back. On the back of the images in the upper right hand corner, written lightly in pencil, in squiggly cursive, are the names “Mr. Elias H. Goodenow, Clarendon, Orleans Co. NY” and “Mrs. Cynthia Goodenow, Clarendon, Orleans Co. NY.” But we are not done with the back yet. On the back of Elias’ image there are more clues. We have “At E. Parker’s Gallery Only. Opposite Village Hall, Brockport, NY.” Now, we know who the photographer was (sort of). In the 1863 Rochester City Directory there is a Mrs. E. Parker listed as a photographer at 64 Main, Brockport, NY. But that’s not all that’s on the back. There is also a declaration: “Made with Wing’s Patent Multiplying Camera.” The name Simon Wing is famous in the world of historical photography buffs. Besides being a Socialist, Simon loved to take out patents for cameras, renew those patents and file infringement lawsuits. I found an article online stating June 1862 as a date for his patent on the “multiplying” camera. I was not able to confirm that. What I did find was a request for a patent renewal in 1860 which I believe was responsible for an infringement lawsuit. In 1847, Albert Southworth had patented a multiplying camera for daguerreotype processing. He allowed that patent to expire. Then along came Simon. In 1855 he purchased that patent and refiled on December 4, 1860. Southworth sued, but Wing won. So, at some time after 1860, Wing started selling his Multiplying Camera. This camera could take up to 72 little images on one metal plate – they were called “gem tintypes.” We have a number of dates revolving around this camera, but I’m going to pick the date which has Wing’s name on it – 1860. Remember that just because Wing had a patent for the camera in 1860, doesn’t mean that’s when the photos were taken. What it does mean is that the photos probably cannot be older than 1860. I also found another patent filed by – guess who – Simon Wing in 1863, for a better photographic mounting paper. I believe this is the type of paper used in the Goodenow images. I’m also adding the photographer’s directory date of 1863 to our clues. We now have 1860 and 1863 added to our bucket of clues.
    size
    Now to the front. First of all, the tiny images are “gem tintypes.” It is matted with thin foil and mounted on a CDV (Carte de Visite).  The CDV was at its most popular between 1863 and 1877, although it made its first appearance in 1859. There is a design around the photograph called a “cartouche.” These were popular between 1862 and 1864. These two images are also tinted; the better tinted images were made during the Civil War.  Let’s add another date, 1864.
    Tint

    Last we will look at the people themselves. The problem here is that we are limited as to what we can see. Cynthia’s hair is so dark in the image it’s hard to tell just what style it is, but she either has a large bun or her hair is contained in a snood. There is also something – a ribbon maybe – circling a portion of her hair. She is wearing a broach which has a touch of gold-leaf added to it, and that makes it hard to tell what the broach is. It’s hard to tell what kind of shoulders or bodice she’s wearing, but I would guess that if we saw the entire dress there would be a big puffy crinoline.  If we could see how full the crinoline was, we could arrive at a more accurate date. Elias has on a wide lapel jacket with a vest. It was hard for me to see if the shirt had a collar and whether he was wearing a tie or a cravat. When I zoomed in, the tie/cravat appears to be tucked into the shirt.  Of course, Elias has facial hair and that had also gained popularity during the Civil War, but then, my husband has facial hair and he wasn’t in the Civil War. Cynthia and Elias also show up in the 1860 census. Their approximate ages at that time were 32 for Elias and 26 for Cynthia. Because I think this photograph was probably taken around the Civil War, I’m adding 1865 and 1866 to the group.

    After all of that, we still do not have an exact date, we only have a guess. We know that the multiplying camera was patented in the 1860s, the photographer was in business at least in 1863, we know that Cynthia was 26 in 1860, though she and looks a few years older in this image, and we know that the gem tin-types were popular during the American Civil War. So, here’s my guess – 1863/64/65/66.

    You never know just what path research will take you down or what pieces of information you will pick up as you go. I don’t know too much more about Elias and Cynthia. What I do know is that they were captured by a camera for a brief moment in time and I find that fascinating.

    And just so you can bore your friends at parties I have included some of the sources I used:
    * 1860 and 1880 Federal Census records for New York
    * PhotoTree.com
    * Photo-Sleuth.com
    * Langdon’s List of 19th Century and early 20th Century Photographers
    * 1863 and 1864 Rochester New York Directory
    * Library of Congress
    And I also found the Goodenow Family Association.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Yizkor Books & Jewish Research

    Wednesday, Apr 19, 2017

    by Delia

    World War II was a desperate time for Europe’s Jews, with millions slaughtered in the Holocaust and more fleeing the Nazi death machine, resulting in the wholesale disappearance of Jewish communities. After the war, the dispersed survivors created Memorial (Yizkor) books to commemorate these lost communities and their residents. The original volumes were in Yiddish, and The Genealogy Center has had a collection of these Yizkor Books for many years.

    JewishGen has undertaken the Yizkor Book Project to republish 800 of these volumes with added translations for ease of use. The Genealogy Center has recently acquired the first 52 of these newly published resources. Read more about the project and come in to take advantage of these wonderful sources.

    Congregation Achduth Vesholom, has also created the Madge Rothschild Resource Center at 5200 Old Mill Road in Fort Wayne, with their Grand Opening scheduled for Sunday April 30, 2017. Join them for an Open House at 2:30 p.m., and keynote speaker, author David Laskin on “One Family, Three Journeys: How One Family Embodied The Sweep Of 20th Century Jewish History,” at 4 p.m. Laskin's family's journey began with a Torah scribe and his family in Russia 150 years ago. Events around the family scattered them to America, to Palestine and into Germany to to fall prey to the Holocaust. Join them for this inspiring lecture!
    Jewish

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Indiana Databases

    Tuesday, Apr 18, 2017

    We have some great new Free Indiana Databases!

    Golden Moments of Hoosier History by Milford E. Anness was published in 1966 for the Sesquicentennial of Indiana’s statehood. The sixteen page booklet highlights some more unusual bits of Indiana’s history, such as information on the utopian community of New Harmony, the lyrics of “Naptown,” a song in praise of Indianapolis, and closes with William Miller’s poem “Ain’t God Good to Indiana.” Aint Good good to IN

    The 98-page booklet Indiana Basketball Handbook, 1975-76 really touches on what’s important in Indiana. Produced by Citizens National Bank of Columbia City, this item contains the basketball out look for Indiana for the 1975-1976 season with high school and college game schedules, tournaments, All-Stars for Indiana and Kentucky, photos of players and general information on and sections on the ABA and NBA.
    IN Basketball 

    Tippecanoe was published by the Tippecanoe Sesquicentennial Committee in Battleground in 1961, and includes fictionalized accounts of the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811.

    Hope, Indiana has a rich history dating back to 1830, when the Moravians settled in the northeastern corner of Bartholomew County. In 1975, the Yellow Trail Museum opened. This museum is dedicated to preserving and displaying the town's history for the public. Forty years after opening, the facility has expanded with a bigger showroom and is currently developing a genealogy research room to focus on the local history and families. Although the new research room won't open until mid-2017, some old Church Records are being preserved and made available to the public via the Allen County Public Library's Genealogy Center website, including Clifford Christian Church, covering 1897 to 1982, and Hawcreek Baptist Church Records, covering 1830 to 1920,

    Maria Creek Baptist Church in Knox County Indiana, was founded in 1809 and abandoned in 1947, although former members returned for annual meetings for about a decade. In 1963 the building was relocated to the campus of Vincennes University to serve as an interdenominational chapel. This booklet recounts a brief history of the congregation.

    William M. Williams supplied his Richland Christian Church, Record Book 1825-1875, Monroe County, Indiana. This item provides a list of members from 1864 to 1975 and Mr. Williams also compiled an every name index to this handwritten document.

    We also have the Annual Report of the First Baptist Church, 1977, Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana, which includes a message from the pastor, a church schedule, lists of new members, losses and deaths, and information about various groups within the congregation.

    The Spencerville High School, Beacon, 1942 from DeKalb County, Indiana, was published by the Senior Class and is dedicated for former Spencerville students away in the war. It includes individual photos of the seniors, class photos of grades 1 through 11, staff, activities, and an alumni roll from 1909 to 1940.

    And, finally, another cemetery indexed and made available from Jim Cox, this one is Elizabethtown Cemetery in Delaware County, Indiana. Each entry provides name, dates, and occasionally, notes, such as “son of,” “wife of,” or military notations.

    We thank everyone for helping us make our website robust and free to all!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Our Military Heritage – New 20th Century Documents

    Friday, Apr 14, 2017

    Our friends have been very generous lately with military records. This time we will look at new 20th Century records.

    We have Story of the Thirty-Third Division in World War I. This regimental history was published by the Chicago Daily News and mentions many of the soldiers by name. Third Squadron Air Service: September 15, 1918 to January 24, 1919 consisted of 152 men, mostly from the Midwest. Each man is listed with his rank and home address. 
    We have a high resolution image of a photograph of the 375 Co., 409 M.S.T., Lt. Morris Knapp, Commanding, also from World War I. Finally we have an update consisting of “Letters Received” and “Miscellaneous Documents” for the Alois Masbaum WWI collection.

    We have images of W.A. Clarke’s V-Mail from Europe in 1945 to his family in Crown Point, New York. We have records for Allen Henry Wisely and Walter Wisely, of Fort Wayne, both in the US Navy in World War II. The records were scanned by family friend and Genealogy Center volunteer, Don Weber, and contain photographs, Christmas and post cards and clippings.
     
    Ornell Stauffer, US Army Air Corps, was a hero in World War II. This Hoosier was shot down over Japan in 1944 in his plane. “Calamity Sue,” named for his baby daughter. His widow and daughter finally received his medals in 2015.

    Images of War: The Pacific Theater, published by the World War II Memorial Society offers pages of photographs of events in the South Pacific. And we have a commemorative booklet for Aro Equipment Corporation, Bryan, Ohio, in 1943 when the company won the Army Navy E for Excellence Award, which includes a list of all employees serving in the military.

    We have a history of the 3rd and 14th Field Hospital in the Korean War. Besides a history of the combined units, there are photographs of the officers and enlisted personnel.

    Donald G. Allen of Bedford, Indiana served in the United States Navy from 1951-1955. He was a fire control technician third class on the battleship USS Wisconsin and saw combat in the Korean War. Sara Allen donated his photograph collection from his time in service, including other service members at work or play and visitors to the ship.

    Geo & Don 
    Finally, we have various military records of our fabulous volunteer, Don Weber, who served in the US Navy during peacetime. These documents include ID cards, evaluations, shore patrol assignments, examinations and much more. Don also provided the World War II records of his father George Anthony Weber, who served with the US Army in Europe. These records include his discharge, ration cards, Christmas cards, post newsletters, post cards, and letters. One photo, shown here, is of George holding hands with his young son, Don, all dressed up in his miniature uniform. It’s a beautiful family moment!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Even More Free Family Resources

    Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017

    Let’s start with the Asia Rohn Family, which includes the 1849 appointment for Asia as First Lieutenant of the 68th Pennsylvania Militia. The Slaughter Family Materials are photos of this Kansas family.

     

    Dennis McClurg donated his Massey Osborne and Runnymede Farm which deals with Massey Osborne who married first Hugh Ferguson then William Castleman, and the farm (house pictured below) located in what is now Frederick County, Virginia. Dennis has also donated his Eleanor Harbin (1736-1840): Woman of the American Revolution. Eleanor was born in 1736 and married William Triplett in 1757. He died in 1782. Her husband and at least three sons fought in the American Revolution and she supplied more than a thousand pounds of beef to the North Carolina Militia.
    Runnymede   

    We have Descendants of John Porter and Sarah Null Porter & Copy from Porter Family Reunion Minutes, 1917-1946. This scan of handwritten material is not searchable, and will have to be browsed but if you are connected to these families, the effort may be worthwhile as the minutes not only include the business part of the reunions, but also vital record notes for family members.

     

    Luigi Castiglione: L’uomo di Pazienza was written by Louis Luardo Castiglione about the Luigi and Maria Castiglione family of Italy and Pennsylvania and New York, and adds memories concerning family and neighbors. We also have Ancestors of Dahlia Marguerite Helm and Louis L. Castilian by Louis Castilian includes information on the Castiglione, Helm, Stockton and Rodes families, as well as a transcription on the diary of Margaret Norman Miller of Walthourville, Georgia as General Sherman’s troops marched through her village in 1864.

     

    In 1976, Robert W. Marhenke (1931 - 2014) of Lincoln, Nebraska received a letter from his young son asking him about his ancestors and grandfather. This began a 40-year project of researching his family's history, leading from Germany in the 1700s to various states in the USA today, including Indiana, Illinois, and Nebraska. Found here are the records, notes, documents, and photos he accumulated during his search, as well as information on intermarried families. The Marhenke Collection was brought to us through Mr. Dan Replogle, who took care of the collection after Mr. Marhenke's passing. Mr. Replogle connected with Mr. Marhenke while researching his own ancestor, Frederich Marhanka (relationship unconfirmed).

     

    William Krause II, Ph.D, provided Krause: Ancestry of William John Krause (Johnny) (June 17, 1915-October 19, 2001) and Hazel Ruby (Nelson) Krause (August 28, 1918 - June 10, 2006), Krause: Beyond Dakota, and Krause: Coming of Age on the Northern Plains, following the Krause, Richter, Peters, Nelson families of Minnesota, Montana, South Dakota and California.

     

    And since we started with a family with a military appointment, let’s end with the image of a 1912 Italian military document for Andres Da Maren. This Foglio di Congedo Illimitato is a discharge paper. 

    Thank you to everyone who contributed!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Our Military Heritage Documents!

    Saturday, Apr 08, 2017

    We’ve had a number of additions to Our Military Heritage!

    Dennis McClurg has donated his Life and Times of Lt. David Randol (1724-1763). David Randol was born in Connecticut and married Temperance Price in 17433. He died at the Battle of Bushy Run in Pennsylvania in 1763, during the French and Indian War. Dennis also donated Private David Randol (1765-1835): Revolutionary War Veteran, who, at the age of 14 years, enlisted in the 2nd New Jersey Regiment of the Continental Army.

    The correspondence, affidavit and summary of Eliphalet Patee’s Revolutionary War service from  Massachusetts includes various documents testifying to his service in the 1830s and several inquiries as on that service in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
    The file for Edmond Pattee, 7th Massachusetts includes service record, affidavits, widow’s record, and the family Bible.

    Sara Allen generously donated War of 1812 records for Jacob Graves, Tennessee Militia. Jacob was born about 1780 in Virginia or North Carolina. He was married to Catherine "Caty" Black on November 17, 1809 in Sumner County, Tennessee. He enlisted in the War of 1812 on November 13, 1814 and was discharged on May 13, 1815, serving in Capt. Neal's Company Tennessee Militia. He died in February of 1838 in Sumner County, and according to family legend is buried in an unmarked grave in Clark-Mandrell Cemetery on Clark Hollow Road. His presumed brother William Graves also served in the War of 1812 from Sumner County, and another presumed brother Frederick Graves served from Allen County, Kentucky.

    Sara Also donated War of 1812 records for James Willison, New York Militia. James was born Nov. 10, 1790 in New York State and died Sept. 9, 1866 in Barry County, Michigan. He was married twice, first to Betsy Williams around 1810 in NY, and second, after Betsy's death, to Margaret Borthwick on June 5, 1825 in Allegany County, NY. James enlisted in the War of 1812 and served with Capt. James Mack's Company of New York Militia. His second wife Margaret applied for a widow's pension after his death.

    We have also posted War of 1812 Pension Records for Jeremiah Slaughter. Jeremiah served in Captain Luther Leonard’s Company of Ohio Militia and received his pension in 1871. Thomas Patten was a midshipman in the War of 1812 on the ships General Pike and the Superior. He applied for bounty land in 1855 and for a pension in 1871. The records posted on our website include his service record, affidavits of service and various correspondence.

    John Archer served in the 32nd Ohio Infantry during the Civil War. We have his volunteer enlistment record, prisoner of war memorandum, service and pension records, discharge paper, and a photo, seen here, of John and his second wife, Katherine. The records for Aaron Hull, 119th U.S. Colored Troops, includes his pension, widow’s and minor children’s pension records, and proofs of marriage. Records for Johnson Merritt, 117th U.S. Colored Troops, include service and pension records, a history of his disability, various affidavits and widow’s pension records.
    Archer

    William Hinkle served in the 44th Indiana, the 152nd Pennsylvania and the 26th Pennsylvania during the Civil War. The documents we have for him contain discharge records from all three regiments, his journal and some letters.

    We have Civil War records for several members of the Treece family. Records for Isaac Treece, 9th Michigan Infantry consist of his pension file including the questionnaire and various affidavits. The records for Joab Treece, 31st Illinois Infantry, offer pension records, including a declaration for children, marriage record and family Bible. And the records for John Treece, 38th Indiana Infantry, include his pension records, marriage and death records.

    Also added were pension records for several members of the Tharp(p) family. Records for James Tharp, 8th Kansas Infantry, Abraham Thrapp, 24th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Bennet Thrapp, 130th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Elias Thrapp, 155th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, James Thrapp, 63rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and Simeon Thrapp, 4th U.S. Artillery.

    Thanks to everyone who donated! 
     

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Free Family Databases!

    Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017

    Today we are highlighting some of new Family Resources in our Free Databases!

    We will start off with Barbier Family Ancestry, but there’s so much more than just the family of Jacque (Jacob) Barbier and Mary Duprey family of France. It also includes Grant, Richardson, Darling, Smith and Boger families, with photos and copies of original documents.
     
    The Bowen Record Book Images were made available through the generosity of Laura Baird Ray, daughter of Janice Nimke Baird who was the daughter of Caroline Miller Bowen Nimke. The original owner of this work was Herbert Bowen of Detroit, MI in 1892. This unique record book details the family and descendants of Richard Bowen. A number of way-points are created to provide direct access to sections of this largely handwritten work. To appreciate the document you are encouraged to browse through the images

    Mary Louis Johnson Mahar has allowed us to post Dawson Claypool Genealogy, detailing of the James Albert Dawson and Margaret Claypool/Cleypool of West Virginia and Ohio, and the King/Collinson Genealogy, on the Corwin Samuel King-Mary C. Collinson family of Ohio. David Sprunk allowed us to post From Berkshire to Elmore: An Introductory History of the Deacon Family which also includes Brunson, Nutt, Gilbert and Humphries families.    
     
    Leslie F. Larson provided a copy of her Zion in the New World: The Lubarskys Find the Goldene Medina which follows the family from Russia, to Philadelphia and on to San Francisco. Below is a photo of the family after they settled in California. Mahar Family, 1810-2016 follows the family of James Mahar and Anna Carrigan from Ireland to Illinois.
    Lubarsky family

    Genealogical Record of the Descendants of Levi Osborn and Catherine (Ashburn) Osborn was compiled by Cressa Obsorn Parker in 1981, revised by Bernard and Caroline Osborn in 1993 and updated again in 2016 by Carolyn Keel Osborn and Glenna Osborn Raber, and includes minutes of the Osborn Reunions from 1928 to 1983.

    And, finally, we have several additions to previously posted materials including more from Brian Paul Kaess with New Addition of Notes on the Kaess Family and Addendum 2 to  “Kaess Ochiltree Swartz Family History”  and more on the Ewing Family: William Ewing Riddle Collection.

    Thanks to everyone for contributing!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Database Additions

    Tuesday, Mar 28, 2017

    We have an interesting selection of items that have been added to our Free Databases recently. 

    Thanks to regular contributor, Jim Cox, there are a number of Adair County, Kentucky cemeteries now online to search or browse. These include the A. B. Turner Cemetery, A. Leach Cemetery, Abrell Cemetery, Absher Cemetery, Acree Cemetery, Adkins Cemetery, Allen Cemetery, Andrew Cemetery, and Asper-Yates Cemetery. All may be found at our Other States Databases page under Kentucky.

    We have also posted a four page booklet for Plans for Erecting and Maintaining a Memorial in the Old Cemetery at Cadiz, Ohio (Harrison County). This 1934 booklet presents the plan and pleads for funding, as well as listing the names and years of those known to be buried there and an elevation of the planned memorial.
    Cadiz Cemetery

    Finally, we have Washington: Baltimore and Ohio Guide, a 32-page tourism booklet for the District of Columbia, published by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1929. It contains visitors information and photos of many area attractions, including the Lincoln Memorial, Union Station, and the White House, as well as information on tour trips conducted by the railroad, a history of the B&O, and a listing and map of the locations of the railroad’s passenger ticket offices from New York and the east to Chicago and St. Louis. The photos alone are a fabulous treat!
     

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Swiss Church Records Website

    Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017

    by John

    The church records of Canton Bern, Switzerland, are among the most complete genealogical resources for any place in continental Europe. Many registers are unbroken back to the sixteenth century. Finding the appropriate register involves knowing the town where a family held citizenship or voting rights. Church registers, at least in theory, contained the record of the births, marriages, and deaths of all those that held hereditary citizenship in that town, even if they resided elsewhere. In most cases, church officials maintained separate registers for hereditary citizens who lived in the town and those living out-of-town (typically called “Auswärtige Bürger”). Sometimes a third set of registers were maintained for town residents who were not citizens (called “Ausbürger”).

    For a number of decades the Family History Library has made the Canton Bern church registers available on microfilm for borrowing. Later, when the microfilms of the registers were digitized, Swiss officials placed restrictions on the images, making the digital versions viewable on Familysearch only to LDS Church members with valid logins or from computers specifically located in LDS Church libraries (not member public libraries). The late genealogist Lewis Rohrbach offered DVDs of the registers at expensive prices, but with his death and the closing of his publishing house, Picton Press, the DVDs are no longer available for sale. The lack of an easy way to view the registers has made it frustrating to Swiss researchers seeking full, convenient access to a large body of material.

    Very recently the State Archives for Canton Bern has made the images of the records available free from its own website. To access the records, go to this link, and click on the small box with the plus-sign to the immediate left of the word “Kirchenbücher.” If the parish you want starts with the letters A through N, you will see a list displayed. If it falls later in the alphabet, click on “Open the next 100 entries,” and an additional 77 towns will appear. In either case, to view the options, click again on the tiny box with the plus-sign immediately to the left of the town you want to view. A list of specific books will appear with ranges of dates. Baptisms are included in books marked “Taufrodel,” marriages are in “Eherodel,” and deaths are in “Totenrodel.” Make note of the Auswärtige registers that recorded the out-of-town citizens. To view the records, double-click on the book you want. A further breakdown of the registers will appear, and you will have to click again on a separate link marked “PDF.” Once you do so, a file of the entire roll will display. Be patient for the download, since it is not instantaneous, especially for larger files.
    Swiss

    The registers are still not indexed. Some names and vital record events can be searched separately through the link to the International Genealogical Index (IGI), available on Familysearch. These references are not linked to specific images and represent only a fraction of the total names. However the IGI can sometimes be helpful for translating a particular surname, since some families in some towns have been extensively researched.

    While we are unable to say when the registers will be made searchable for every name, the fact that they are available at all, freely online, makes this a happy day for genealogists researching this part of Switzerland.  An added bonus is the easy access to the large collection Swiss coats of arms, called “Familienwappen,” also available from the archives’ website. These images display in full color and show the date and town where the arms were granted.


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Indiana Databases

    Monday, Mar 06, 2017

    We have an interesting mix of new Free Indiana Databases that have been added recently.

    First up, we have two Hancock County, Indiana school related items. Students and Teachers, Schoolhouse at Fortville, 1881-1887 is just what it says, a list of people connected with the Fortville Schoolhouse. Each entry includes the name of the student or teacher, the exact dates of the school terms attended, and occasionally, the age of the person. The other item is a list of graduates of the Vernon Township Schools Commencement, 1898, held 28 May 1898 at the Methodist Church in McCordsville. The announcement was found in the belongings of Andy H. Denney. The information in both of these were made available through the kind generosity of Rebecca Crowe and the Fortville-Vernon Township Public Library.

    Gethsemane Evangelical Lutheran Church Records, 1958-2004 is a data file contributed by Earle Swanson, and was also published in book form under the title “Gethsemane Family.”  The data is from the Gethsemane Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1505 Bethany Lane, Fort Wayne. Each entry provides the congregant’s name, and varying information including birth date, place and parents’ names; baptism place, date and sponsor; confirmation date and place; marriage date, place and spouse; admission and/or release dates; and membership status.

    We have another title abstract in Allen County, this one in the Elizabeth Hanna Addition, part of Lot 55. The abstract begins in 1824 and runs through 1980, and is a fascinating document for the history and biographical detail it includes.

    Our last item is the City of Fort Wayne--Community Development Library. So far, it contains 852 documents consisting of 47,897 pages. With records dating back to the 1850s, the Community Development Library is a digitized collection of city government documents that cover a variety of subjects, with an emphasis on downtown development and revitalization, annexations, neighborhoods, urban planning and economic development. It also contains information on such diverse topics as flood control, transportation, housing and the environment. For anyone researching any aspect of history in Fort Wayne, this is an important resource. More will be added to this collection as it becomes available


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Additions to Our Military Heritage

    Friday, Feb 03, 2017

    Take a look at some of our newest additions to Our Military Heritage!

    The John Silvis Civil War letters are difficult to read, but for anyone searching his regiment, the 11th Pennsylvania might be rewarded with some useful information from these 1861-1962 documents.

    We have a portrait and other documents relating to Alfred Boerger, U.S. Army soldier with Company F of the Quartermaster’s Department in World War I. He died after being exposed to poison gas. His remains were returned to Fort Wayne in 1921 and he was buried with honors in Lindenwood.

    Brian Paul Kaess has allowed us to post two World War I letters from Talmage Dawson to his family in Kansas. Unlike Alfred, Talmage made it home and lived until 1974.

    Finally, we have the World War I draft record and discharge papers of Fred Suiter of Michigan. Fred also made it home and lived in Michigan.

    Richard Wells Shorter was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and served in World War II in the Army Air Corps in India serving as an air traffic controller. His letters have been made available for preservation by his sister, Sheila Shorter, of Fort Wayne.

    Brian Paul Kaess has also made available photographs and military information on Paul Swartz, a World War II sailor and Francis Swartz, an Air Force pilot during the Korean War.
    paulrudolphswartz

    And finally we have a photograph and military experiences for William E. Haste, who served in the Korean War from 1950 to 1952.

    Remember that you, too, can memorialize relatives in Our Military Heritage by submitting scans of photographs and documents, or a biography.


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Black History Month Images Revealed - Alexandre Dumas

    Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017

    by Kay

    In February we will be celebrating Black History Month. We always create some kind of flyer, poster, slide, advertisement. But have you ever wondered just what some of those images are that we use. Let's take a look at some of the images used in the making of our flyer for Black History Month 2017.

    Thomas-Alexandre Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie, also known as Alexandre Dumas (March 25, 1762 - February 26, 1806) was a general in Revolutionary France and the highest-ranking man of African descent ever in a European army. He was the highest ranking black man in any Western world military until 1975, when Daniel “Chappie” James Jr. became a four-star general in the United States Air Force.
    BHM Dumas

    Born in Saint-Domingue, Thomas-Alexandre was of mixed race, the son of Alexandre Antoine Davy de la Pailleterie, a white French nobleman, and Marie-Cessette Dumas, an enslaved mother of African descent. His father brought him to France for his education. Slavery had been illegal in France since 1315, this meant that any slave born out of the country could be freed while in France, but he struggled in his later years and fell into poverty.

    It could be that you have never heard of Thomas, but I bet you may have heard of his son - author Alexandre Dumas. It is said that Alexandre Dumas based a number of his books on his father’s exploits. To learn more about Thomas-Alexandre Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie, read "The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo," by Tom Reiss.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Black History Month Revealed - Cotton, Slaves & Rice

    Saturday, Jan 28, 2017

    By Kay

    As we remember Black History Month in February, we always create some kind of flyer, poster, slide, or advertisement. Have you ever wondered just what some of those images are that we use. Let's take a look at some of the images used in the making of our flyer for Black History Month 2017.
     
    "I have found that, to make a contented slave, it is necessary to make a thoughtless one. It is necessary to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be made to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceases to be a man." Frederick Douglass.

    Slaves picking cotton. I cannot even imagine working in a field of sticky cotton from sun-up to sun-set. There were no breaks, no lunches. The average slave had to fill a bag strapped to their shoulder with 200lbs of cotton. They were bent over daily, whether it was sunny or rainy. If they didn't make their quota, they were whipped. When a slave’s day ends it doesn't, he or she has their own house to tend to.
    abeslide5

    For more information visit:
    Twelve Years a Slave:  Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped
    and Life on a Southern Plantation, 1854, or read "A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and Virginia," by Richard S. Dunn.

    There is an image of a stone table used by auctioneers to display a slave from the Green Hill Plantation, located on Long Island, Virginia. The plantation was built by Samuel Pannill, who first bought 600 acres from William and Moses Fuqua in 1797, and added to and developed the plantation until his death in 1864. According to tradition, these original stone features were used in the auction and sale of slaves. The smaller of the two elements was used by the auctioneer while the stone table was used to display the best qualities of the slaves. The authenticity of this story has not been documented. Both auctioneer's stone and table are in good condition, and are presently used by the owners to hold milk buckets, etc. The auctioneer's stand is a solid stone block, approximately 1'-2" x 3'-0" x 10" high. The stone table approximately 3' square and 3' high, and is supported by four rectangular stones set upright into the ground. A bottom stone is shaped as a cross to fit between the posts at each corner. Top stone about 3" thick; bottom stone about 2-1/2" thick. No mortar was used.
    Slave_auction_block_Green_Hill_Plantation

    Learn more about Greenhill Plantation or read "Northern Money, Southern Land: the Lowcountry Plantation Sketches of Chlotilde R. Martin," by Chlotilde R. Martin.

    The Rice-Raft image is one of 269 from South Carolina that are part of the Robert N. Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views at the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections. The original image was used in a stereoscopic viewer. Stereoscopic viewers make the 2-dimensional images appear 3-dimensional when viewed through the stereoscope. But even without the stereoscope this image has always haunted me. Just called Rice-raft, this image was published in 1895 and shows a boatload of rice-straw which was used for fodder, bedding and paper-stock. Standing on top of this rice-straw is a large group of African-American people. What was going through their minds? Were they irritated with the cameraman, dreading the work that was to come or enjoying the breeze which was ruffling their skirts? Were these individuals part of the Gullah Geechee culture which inhabited South Carolina?

    Rice was very profitable for the Carolina colonies. There is a debate on how the rice arrived at our shores. Did it come as part of the "Columbian Exchange" or did the slaves bring the rice grains from Africa and supplement their diets with it? However it arrived on our shores, eventually it would take a lot of people to work the rice plantations which developed. Those slaves would do everything from making the fanner baskets, building canals to carry water, to standing in stagnant water all day, bent over, planting rice seedlings.
    16.0415.riceraft

    Learn more about the Gullah Geechee culture, Low country life, or this image specifically, or read Philip Morgan's "African American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry: the Atlantic World and the Gullah Geechee."

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Family Resources

    Wednesday, Jan 25, 2017

    We have added new material to our free Family Resources files. The largest of these is additions to the Ewing Family Association and Related Materials. This large addition includes 21 separate Ewing family files, including Brief Account of the Ancestry of the Kentucky and Indiana Descendants of Putnam Ewing, Descendants of John Ewing of Carnshanagh, Descendants William Ewing of Stirling, Ewing Family Chronicles 1629-1979, Harvey Canterbury Klemann, Ewing-McCulloch-Buchanan Genealogy, Grandfather’s Farm: Life on the Chantey Plantation of Squire Maskell Ewing, and One Hundred Years for Christ: Tome Memorial United Methodist Church, Port Deposit, Maryland as well as many others. Many are keyword searchable or can be searched with the federated search from our home page. If you have any interest in Ewing families, browsing would be advisable.

    The next item is Arthur Hastings Grant’s The Grant Family: A Genealogical History of the Descendants of Matthew Grant of Windsor, Connecticut. 1601-1898, which was published in 1898. This volume was almost 600 pages to Grant family research and is keyword searchable and also has its own index as part of the volume.
     
    John B. McCaleb was a lawyer and judge in northeastern Arkansas, starting out in Sharp County, then moving to Independence County, although he was also well known in Arkansas in the legal community. The Diaries of John Bell McCaleb: The Times & Travels of a Northeast Arkansas Lawyer have been transcribed for the years 1906 through 1925 and many of those years have their own surname index. His notations include the petition for the naturalization of Richard Mead, formerly of England, various murder cases and his own business notes. If you are researching northeastern Arkansas, this could certainly be a treasure trove of information.

    Susan B. Vanarsdale, daughter of Peter and Charity (Demaree) Vanarsdale, was born in Kentucky in 1824 and died in Missouri in 1856. The Susan B. Vanarsdale Diary 1847-1855 covers the time spent in Missouri, courtships and friendships, family and visits.

    These are all terrific additions to the free resources that we are pleased to make available to you!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Black History Month Images Revealed - Joseph de Bologne Saint-Georges

    Thursday, Jan 19, 2017

    by Kay

    In February we will be celebrating Black History Month. We always create some kind of flyer, poster, slide, advertisement. But have you ever wondered just what some of those images are that we use. Let's take a look at some of the images used in the making of our flyer for Black History Month 2017.

    Joseph de Bologne Saint-Georges was born December 25, 1745 on a plantation near Basse-Terre, on the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. His father was a nobleman by the name of George de Bologne de Saint-Georges and his mother was Anne Nanon, a black slave and mistress of George. Joseph was educated in France, where his father was a Gentleman of the King's Chamber. Joseph started fencing at the age of 13 and by the age of 17 he became Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges.
    BHM Chevalier_de_Saint-Georges

    Because of his fencing, Saint-Georges earned the nickname of "the god of arms." It was also at this time he became a skilled musician and composer. He played the harpsichord and violin, and he composed and conducted. His string quartets were among the first in France and were first performed 1772 and published starting in 1773, when he was became conductor of Le Concert des amateurs.

    Not all was rosy for Saint-Georges, three female singers objected to a "mulatto" directing and he fell on hard times. However, he had friends in the Duke of Orléans and England’s George, Prince of Wales. He was friends with the Marquise de Montesson and Queen Marie-Antoinette. What's that saying about "with friends like that?" Maybe Joseph's timing was off because along came the French revolution and things fell apart. He then became the colonel of 1,000 volunteers of color and helped halt some treasonous activity during the French revolution. But, then again, his timing was off and he was imprisoned for 11 months on false charges, before being acquitted. At least he avoided the guillotine. He then returned to music and founded the orchestra of Le Cercle de L'Harmonie in 1797. He died on June 10, 1799.
     
    Listen online to his musical compositions.

    To read more about This fascinating man, read "Before There was Mozart: The story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George," by Lesa Cline-Ransome and "Monsieur de Saint-George : Virtuoso, Swordsman, Revolutionary, A Legendary Life Rediscovered," by Alain Guede.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center