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  • New Free Chuch and School Material

    Sunday, Dec 04, 2016

    We have some great church and school records added recently to our Free Databases, starting with ten volumes of AME Women’s Missionary Society Materials: Illinois Conference Branch books for 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2007; and Michigan Annual Conference 1999, Devotional Service 1999, Flint Area Report 1999, West Detroit Area Report 1999, Societies Report 1999, and the Big MAK Implementation Manual. All are name and keyword searchable and these are a good reminder that tomorrow’s history is now!

    From Bartholomew County, Indiana, we have Sharon Baptist Church Records. There are 17 scanned volumes consisting of 1782 pages of Meeting Minutes 1874-1927, Sunday School records to 1934 and the B.Y.P.U 1922-1923. While these records are not searchable, chronological browsing is easy and, if u for those with ancestors in the county, could be very rewarding.

    We have the Official Membership Record of Mount Pleasant Methodist Church in Kosciusko County, Indiana, contains children’s baptisms, records of members, and a list of inactive members. These records are browseable.

    There are also 18 volumes of Lima Presbyterian Church records from Howe, LaGrange County, Indiana, which includes Benevolent Fund Records, Deacons’ Records, Sessions Minutes and more, covering various years between 1833 and 1960. Again, not searchable, but the volumes’ titles will make browsing easier.

    The records for Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Indianapolis, which covers the 1950s to 1998, are not searchable either, but once can browse through rolls of members, communions, baptisms, confirmations, marriages and funerals by date.

    And, finally, for church records, we have the St. Joseph Catholic Church Directory of Dubois County, Indiana, which includes a history of the parish, photos of the current staff and committees, and a family photograph directory. It is searchable by keyword or name.

    The Manchester College (Wabash County, Indiana) Alumni Directory, 1947 is another nice addition. It contains an alumni directory, a list of four year graduates from Manchester College from 1900 to 1945, and a list of alumni from Mount Morris College, of Mount Morris, Ogle County, Illinois, which merges with Manchester College in 1932.

    Like the Manchester College Alumni Directory, the Topeka (Kansas) High School Sunflower, 1946 is name and keyword searchable. The Sunflower is typical of yearbooks of the era, with lots of photos and advertisements for local businesses. The program for the Spring Concert is an added feature.

    Finally, many items have been added to the Deborah Edison School Collection including Norwoodville School, Polk County, Iowa; Prairie High School, Lucas County, Iowa; Edwards School from Ogemaw County, Michigan; Maple Grove School and Ogilvie School from Osceola County, Michigan; School District 34, Traverse County, Minnesota; Guilford Union School, Chenango County, New York; Harpersfield School, Delaware County, New York; Wileytown School, Hartwick School, School Districts 7 and 12, and the State Normal School from Otsego County, New York; Raymond School, Niagara County, New York; Pardus School, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania; Plank Road School, Mercer County, Pennsylvania; Schortz School, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania; and Pumpkin Hill School, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. Browse to view these school souvenirs under Other States Resources and use the search function at each to look for specific names.

    Thanks to everyone who gathers these items and allows us to scan them for all to use!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Family History Materials!

    Thursday, Dec 01, 2016

    We’ve added a number of new Family Resources to our Free Databases recently that you might find useful.

    Bredemeyer family history--Chronik und Genealogie der Familie und Sippe Bredemeyer (Chronicle and Genealogy of the Family and Clan Bredemeyer) was written by Karl Bredemeyer in 1966 and contains maps, coats of arms and photographs. It is in German but is keyword or name searchable.

    The Frederic Hyde fan chart is a large chart that has been in our collection for many years, but has now been scanned and posted for all to see. It is faded and is not indexed, so making it available to view is the best way for others to use it.

    Spencer Coffey has allowed us to post three of his genealogies: The Kilgore Family of Mount Sherman & Low Gap, Arkansas, Amos Burrel Lackey [1818-1896] of Low Gap, Arkansas, and The Spencers of Mount Sherman, Arkansas and its supplement, An Ancestral Supplement to the Spencers of Mount Sherman, Arkansas. These of these families were in Newton County, Arkansas and includes information on the Kilgore, Stevenson and Culpeper families. All of these can also be searched by name of keyword.

    Carl Mumford has provided permission for us to post his Mumford's of the New World: James Mumford, Sr. and John Mumford, Sr., which he compiled in 2016, and we were given permission to post Eugene Perry’s Grogan--A Record of the Grogan Family. Margaret McCarthy has also supplied McCarthy--McCarthy Family History, and Ralph Knee provided Knees in the Civil War, which includes biographical information on the descendants of Philip or George Knee, brothers who arrived from Prussia about 1763. All of these, also, are name and keyword searchable.

    We also have images and transcriptions of the William A. Holladay-Winona Pearl Litton and the James Montgomery-Esther Wood Family Bibles, as well as Nellie Doyle Prack’s My Life as I Remember It, containing the early reminiscences and activities in Chicago. 

    Brothers Ernst August Oehrling and Carl Heinrich Constantine Oehrling immigrated from Arnstadt, Thuringia, Germany to Wisconsin, United States, in the 1840s. As the families grew and separated, letters were exchanged to maintain the familial connection. We are happy to be able to post these letters, as well as family journals, photographs, greeting cards and pedigree charts. While these records are not searchable, the material has been divided into sections to make browsing a breeze.

    We also have three documents from the Valentine family of Allen County, Indiana, including the marriage records for James Valentine and Janet (Nellie) Parks, and their daughter Elizabeth to Ralph Fast, as well as a sketch of the John Valentine homestead.

    Margo Butner has allowed us permission to post her Butner Welty Family file in Next Generation presentation format. Other surnames included are Camp, Clare, Gray, Jolliffe, Lindsay, Lyon, Stewart and Ward. Using the Next Generation features, one can search not only by name but by birth, christening, death and burial date and place.

    We also have updates to several previously posted collections, including an Addendum to “Kaess Ochiltree Swartz Family History” and Kaess/Dawson Family History Addendum, both from Brian Paul Kaess,

    Take a few minutes to browse these new collections to see what you might find!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Thankful

    Thursday, Nov 24, 2016

    by Delia

    Thanksgiving in America is devoted to giving thanks for all that we, personally and as a country, have. Through the years, we have all had many things for which to be thankful, from soldiers returning from war, financial difficulties averted or survived, to medical crises cured or endured. We are thankful for family, friends and home. But as a genealogist of many years (whose mother did family history research even earlier), there are things for which I am thankful, and I hope you will go to our Facebook page and express your thanks for genealogical blessings, too.

    Some of mine are:
    1. Records. When Mother was doing research in the 1940s and 1950s, not many records had been published. She could only go to court houses and go through records. Thank you to everyone who had gather records for publication.

    2. Indexes. Even when I started to do research in the 1970s, many older county histories were not indexed, and most of the 1860 and 1870 federal census had not been indexed. Thank you to everyone who has every worked on an index, either for something small, or for a large indexing project.

    3. Computers and the Internet. What a leap forward! Indexes available online! Optical character recognition (OCR)! Scanners to enable records to be examined! States, counties and private groups placing information online to be searched from home! Or from my phone! And speaking of which…

    4. Smart phones. Storage of information, ease of searching and free calls to court houses, libraries and long lost relatives!

    5. People. Friends and contacts that I’ve made within the genealogical community and all of the wonderful people that come to visit The Genealogy Center, either in person or virtually.

    6. USBs. So that I can save images of documents or copies onto a small device that I can carry with me.

    7. And, finally, that, after 33 years in the department, photocopies are still just ten cents! Plus the prints are on archival quality paper, so no nasty surprises in a few years!

    So, now it’s your turn. Let us know on Facebook what you are thankful for!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Additions to Our Military Heritage

    Sunday, Nov 13, 2016

    We have more additions to Our Military Heritage!

    For the Civil War, we have the service records for Isaac Allyn and Laban Gurley, both of Company F, 25th Indiana Infantry, the pension record of John Holbert, Company D, 2nd Tennessee Infantry (U.S.), who died at Flat Lick, Kentucky in March of 1862 which includes the Widow’s pension for his mother, Elizabeth, and the letters of William B. Parker, 2nd Michigan, May 1864 through April 1965. Most are to his wife, Polly, whom he left behind in Clinton County, Michigan. Also included at the letters to Polly from her brother, Alvin B. Wonsey, of the 27th Michigan.

    We also have the World War I letters of William Tursman of Chicago to June Beck in Goshen, Indiana.

    The Good Ol’ Days: Remember Our Time in Pearl Harbor and Between the Tours of Duty, by Frank John "Jack" Zwolinski, Jr. provides biographical information on his parents Frank, Sr., and Agnes Zubris Zwolinski, the family and Frank senior’s memories of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    Battle History 473rd United States Infantry provides information on that unit’s experiences in Italy in 1945. It begins with a list of the unit’s men killed in action, along with their home addresses. Following are six chapters detailing the events of the campaign, a list of awards to the unit, messages from various commanding officers, and maps of the theater of operations.

    And we have the Fort Sam Houston, Texas Telephone Directory, December 1944. It includes phone numbers for the various units on the base, and the residents with their ranks, units, address and phone numbers.

    We thank all those who donated the materials so that we can bring them to you!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • A Cemetery Visit with the Voice of Reason

    Monday, Oct 31, 2016

    by Kay

    I often visit cemeteries. There are so many interesting things to discover; so much history. Cemeteries can be peaceful, sad, beautiful, and sometimes – spooky, depending on the vivid imagination of the person walking through the cemetery.
     
    Time for a cautionary tale. In tracking down my relatives, I have often visited graveyards/cemeteries – alone. I will confess that there have been times while planting flowers I have even talked myself into a “they’re coming to get you, Barbara” moment.  But the most “standing-hair-on-the-back-of-my-neck” moment came a few years ago while planting flowers on my great-grandfather’s grave. And, this time I was not alone. Yes, I managed to drag my daughter along with me. She is what I lovingly call a “genealogy helper-whiner.” For those of you who do genealogy or research I know you are familiar with this type of helper. They’ll go along with you, but they’ll be bored or tired or complain or whine or sleep. But sometimes they are also the Voice of Reason.
     
    One of the cemeteries I visit has a plethora of great-great-great-great-great relatives. Here’s the problem with this particular cemetery. It’s very old and located down a winding country road. It’s in a very isolated area along a river bank. Do you know what the ground is like along a river bank? It’s soft. So when one is walking in this isolated cemetery one feels as if one is walking on a sponge. Nothing creepier than walking in a cemetery where the ground has a bit of give to it.
    Kay's blog Grave
     
    Anyway, one day it was time to plant more bulbs, so I pushed my “I’m only going because I love you” daughter into the car and we were off on a road-trip to my favorite soft-ground spooky cemetery, trowels in hand.
     
    We arrived at the cemetery, my daughter’s first comment, “Ewwww, this ground is soft. Ewww.”
     
    That year I planned on planting Irises at my great-grandfather’s grave. Fighting off the devil-mosquitoes we began to dig. Clank! “Oh dear, what was that?” We struck something.
     
    Me: “I hope it wasn’t a coffin.”
    Me: “It’s not a coffin, they’re not that close to the top, it’s probably just a stone.”
     
    More digging, this time with a little bit more trepidation. Something large and white started to appear.
     
    Me: “OMG, it’s a skull, my great-grandfather’s skull!”
    Voice of reason: “It’s not a skull. Probably just some cement they used for foundation.”
    Me: “Nah, that’s not the same texture or color. Maybe it’s a buried treasure.”
    Voice of reason: “Why would one of your poor relatives bury a treasure in a graveyard?”
    Me: “Who knows…I’ve heard some interesting family stories. Let’s keep digging. Hopefully the graveyard police won’t show up.”
    Voice of reason: “I don’t think there is such a thing as graveyard police.”
     
    Flowers momentarily forgotten, we continued to dig. The object got bigger and bigger until it was fully exposed. Guess what it was. Another tombstone. It was in fact the original tombstone of my great-grandfather. Who knew? Not me, that’s for sure. I don’t know if every cemetery is like this one, but evidently the old stones are not thrown away if there is a replacement stone. But, there was also a bonus for this particular one – the dates on the original stone didn’t match the dates on the replacement. I guess research never ends – one step forward, one step back.
     
    What did I gain from this experience? Actually, I gained a lot. I had a wonderful bonding experience with my voice-of-reason daughter and I learned that sometimes buried treasures are better than jewels. I also had a brainstorm that day. You know, there are a lot of tombstones in this particular cemetery which have large spaces between them. Could there be more buried tombstones? Could I actually find my missing great-great-great-grandmother? Just so you know, I have been talking to the cemetery's caretaker. I feel another project coming on....


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Miami Indian Materials Now Online!

    Friday, Sep 23, 2016

    We have several items online now that formerly have only been available as print resources.

    The first is Payments to Miami Indians, 1859. This is a transcription of original payrolls owned by the Allen County-Fort Wayne Historical Society which lists Miami heads of families and individuals who were living east of the Mississippi River and received a payment in 1854.

    Next is Records of the Miami Indians of Indiana, which contains three parts: the 1895 Annuity Payment Roll of the Miami of Indiana who were, at that time, living in Kansas, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory; a collection of newspaper stories on the Miami; and a copy of Chief Godfory’s “Miami Indian Stories,” published in 1961. All of these items are name and keyword searchable.
     
    The last item was from a microfilm collection of Annuities and Census of the Miami Indians. Included are Annuity Payrolls for 1882, 1891, and 1895, the Annuity Payroll for the Eel River Tribe, 1889 Annuity, a transcription for a land division for Francis Godfroy, and the 1881 Census of Miami Indians in Indiana and elsewhere. All of these items are also name and keyword searchable. 

     If you are seeking information on the Miami Tribe of Indiana, these sources would be a good place to search.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Family Histories, Photos & Charts

    Tuesday, Sep 06, 2016

    We’ve recently posted a number of new Family Resources on our Free Databases webpage, starting with Haller/Gibboney/Baldwin Family History and Kaess-Dawson Family History from regular contributor Brian Paul Kaess. These items, as usual, are well researched, and provide citations and are indexed.

    Arnolds in “Western Maryland Catholics” is an extract of Arnold family members found in “Western Maryland Catholics, 1819-1851,” by Richard T. Koch. The extracts provide the information as well as the citation in the book.

    Jean Francis Knight provided Miller, Martin, Scott, Price, Collins, Curtin, Francis: They Came From the British Isles to America. This item is also keyword searchable and provides citations.

    Ancestors of James Norman Pence of Fort Wayne, Indiana, provides fourteen generations from James back and provides photographs when available and more than 60 pages of citations.

    And we also have scans of the Letters of Wilbur Churchward during his Civilian Conservation Corps service with Company 544 in Upland, California and Enaville, Idaho. Dated 1934 to 1936, these letters show a young man who is far away but keeping up with family and friends.

    Next we have two photographic collections. The Helen Adams Harrod Photographs from Indiana and Ohio provides both the photo and the back of each, with identifying information, which can be lacking, such as the photo of a small child on a tricycle simply labeled Annabelle. The other is the Photo Album of the Lawrence Till Family of Allen County, Indiana, which had a number of rural and agricultural and rural photos from Washington Township.
    Annabelle

    Finally, we have some very interesting sources, and there is a story to these. Along with other genealogical material that is donated to us, we receive charts. Many of these are huge, filled with tiny printed names, dates and places. Valuable sources but what do we do with them. In the past, many have been folded into some smaller size and bound to make a book-like resources. Preserved, yes, but the folds will eventually cause tears and the information across the folds can be lost. Through the efforts of some of our scanning partners and our tech, several of these charts have now been scanned and are available on our website. But, wait! There’s more! Once you open the chart, you can click on a section to view an enlargement of the section! This make these sources much more usable! These charts are the Caulkins-Ancestry of Almira Caulkins Chart and the Ancestors and Descendants of Roswell and Eunice (Hine) Caulkins Chart the Maternal and Paternal Fan Charts of the Herbert Eliot Family, The Genealogical Record of the Powers, Harris and Allied Families, More Particularly of the Descendants of Nathaniel Powers and Esther Johnson, John Hough Harris and Lucy May chart, and Descendants of Peter and Elizabeth (Woods) Wallace Chart. Names can be searched in all of these through the Federated Database search on our homepage (where it says “Search our Free Databases).

    Thanks to all who contribute and who helped us scan and make these materials available.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Databases from Across America

    Saturday, Sep 03, 2016

    We have posted a number of new databases for Allen County, but remember, we have a national collection and we like material from all over! We start off this set with a number of cemetery lists, starting with Cemetery Records of Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. This compilation is the copyrighted work of the Manitowoc County Genealogical Society, the Manitowoc Public Library, and the West Foundation. It is through their generosity that this work is presented here. This digitized volume starts with a nice table of contents, which will guide a researcher to tips for researchers, abbreviations used in family history and various religious denominations and ghost cemeteries, then the cemetery listings organized by township. The more than 4000 pages are also name searchable. 

    The next three come to us from T. Bradford Willis, DDS, of Waco, Texas. First Street Cemetery and  Greenwood Cemetery are in McLennan County, Texas, and Sand Flat Cemetery, is in Austin Texas. All three consist of very clear photographs of very clear photographs of each of the tombstones.

    A photograph was passed to us recently of a fire in Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio on 26 January 1929, at two local oil companies. A brief account of the fire is included and the death certificate of the only fatality, James Wayland.

    We also have the Radiator yearbook of Somerville High School in Middlesex County, Massachusetts for 1947. Typical of the era, there are photos of faculty and seniors, class histories, photos of sports and various organizations and seniors’ photos as children. Included are senior Edward Cruz’s report card and an image of his school beanie.
    Beanie

    We also have the New Lisbon Farm Telephone Directory, Otsego County, New York for 1924, which includes the rules and hours for the exchanges.  

    We have records of the Women's Missionary Society, African Methodist Episcopal Church or Illinois, Indiana, Michigan. Most of the material is for annual conferences in the early 2000s, but the Indiana section does include the minutes of the Women's Mite Missionary Society of the Indiana Conference. 

    Finally, we have the Marathon day Program of the Woman’s Benefit Association of the Maccabbees for 1923 in Los Angeles Co, California. This gathering was an international event which included women from all over the United States and Canada. This 80-page

    We hope that you may look and find useful and interesting information in some of these new sources.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Family Resources

    Friday, Aug 05, 2016

    We’ve been very fortunate recently with a large number of new Family Resources on our Free Databases!

    Susan McNelley produced several works that she has allowed us to post, starting with her Following the Maple Leaf Trail: The French-Canadian Ancestry of Joseph Gilman of Taylor County, Wisconsin. This work not only discusses the Gilman family who came from Quebec to New York and on to Wisconsin, but also life among Canadian fur traders, dit names, King’s daughters, midwives of Quebec and more. A very informative work and worth the time to peruse! There are two volumes of Ms. McNeeley’s Aschenbrener family histories: Aschenbrener Roots in the Bavarian/Bohemian Borderland: George and Monika Aschenbrenner of Northern Wisconsin and Aschenbreners of the Wisconsin Northwoods: George and Marietta Aschenbrener of Northern Wisconsin. The first volume covers George and Monika, the immigrants to America, their ancestors and home in Europe and their children. The second volume details the family of their son George and his wife Marietta Gilman. Both volumes are keyword searchable and contain photos and other documents. Her Johnston Family History: Ancestry of the Edward Johnston Family of Fort Wayne, Indiana is the story of the lives of Norma, Edward and Gerald Johnston and their Scots-Irish and German ancestors, and McNelley Family History: The Ancestry of the Oscar McNelley Family of Chicago, Illinois is the history of the McNeeley-Lamb family of New England and the Mikkelsen-Holmes family of Denmark and Chicago. Finally, The Middletons of Gibson City, Illinois chronicles the story of the Middleton, Hoover, Cackley and Howver families. We thank Ms. McNeeley for all of these great family histories!

    James Eckland Dwyer was born in 1944 and died in 2011. His daughter-in-law, Karen Emery Dwyer compiled James Eckland Dwyer's Irish Ancestry to chronicle his Dwyer, Bennett, Murray and Loftus families. Ms. Dwyer also compiled Papa: Gordon Charles Emery which details the Emery, Foote, Donovan and Clancy families. She also produced From the British Isles to America (Williams & Associated Families), which covers the Williams, Pratt, Gough, Butcher, Nibbs, Brennan, Donahue and Shedd families in the British Isles and the United States. We thank Ms. Dwyer for permission to post these items!

    Cindy Peterson of Westerville, Ohio allowed us to post Descendants of Cutlope Gotlieb Hancock, a detailed work of the first four generations of the Cutlope Gotlieb Magdalena Clair Hancock family of Germany, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. One can use a keyword search to find names.

    Phillip A. Hawkins generously his two publications on the descendants of John & Mary Molly (Moore) Hawkins, The Jeffery Hawkins's In 1692 America and Sons of Nathan Hawkins. The first provides evidence as to which son of John and Mary was the father of the Hawkins of Union County, South Carolina. The second discusses John and Mary’s second son Nathan. These items provide a detailed analysis of the problem.

    Lorraine C. McClanahan has provided us copies of her Irvine Genealogy and Irvine Index, which begin with John Irvine and Catharine Garrioch of Scotland. Both works have keyword search capability.

    We have the 1989 program of the Fred W. Jones Appreciation Dinner in Merrillville, Indiana where he was a teacher and coach for many years. And we have two silhouettes and brief biographies of William Haight Leggett and his wife Margaret Peck Wright of New York. These images were donated by Cory Randall.Randall

    Finally, we have Descendants of John Vestall, and The Family of Anne Russell, 1548-1593, both of which were by researcher Drew Blaha of North Carolina. We thank all of these researchers and donors for making our Family Resources page their home.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Our Military Heritage Additions!

    Wednesday, Jul 13, 2016

    We have some new items on Our Military Heritage!

    First, we have the Civil War discharge of Scott County, Indiana native Thomas Stark, who served three years in the 22nd Indiana Infantry. The discharge also includes his physical description.

    We also have the History of the Ohio National Guard and Ohio Volunteers, published by the Cleveland by the Plain Dealer in 1901. This volume concentrated on activities during the Spanish American War, including lists and dates of stations of service, but also includes the history of the Guard from 1876 to 1900.

    We have documents relating to the World War I service of Lt. Edward Francis Morken, 314th Cavalry, including photos, orders, discharge information and various correspondence, as well as the World War I letters of Alois Masbaum of Fort Wayne. He served in the 22nd Engineers from May 1918 to July 1919. His first letter discusses the medical exams and vaccinations he will have to undergo. The descriptions of the camps and activities were always meant to be reassuring to his family back in Fort Wayne.

    For World War II, we have “P-47s vs the GAF,” dated April 13, 1944, which provides personal accounts of the 56th Fighter Group’s combat experiences against the German Air Force, as well as “Scouting, Patrolling, and Sniping,” 1944 War Department Basic Field Manual which details the best techniques for moving about around and behind enemy lines.

    “Hidden Memories of World War II” is an autobiography by Arlis Sizemore who served in World War II in Europe after service in the CCC, and we have the World War II era correspondence of Miss Mabel Poth of 265 Poth Road, Columbus, Ohio and Private George P. Miller of the 166th Infantry, Company "I," A. P. O. # 37, Camp Shelby, Mississippi. We also have the George Vorndran collection which includes his biography, photos, and letters home, and the Howard-Smith-Stiles World War II letters. This grouping comes from the Garrett, DeKalb County, Indiana, area and details interpersonal relations between these connections.

    All of these sources add to our knowledge of World War II activities and thoughts of those who served and those who stayed home.
    HiddenMemoriesOfWWII_000

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Free Databases

    Tuesday, Jul 05, 2016

    Some new Allen County school information has been added to our free Allen County Resources page!

    First up is the whole Central High School yearbook, The Caldron for 1928. From the main page, one can browse to each class, activities such as music, debate, and men’s and women’s sports, or search for a specific name. The scan even includes the inscription by the volume’s original owner, Luella Stark.

    We also have photos from South Calhoun Elementary and Village Elementary. The South Calhoun photos are a series of the class that started kindergarten in 1956 through sixth grade in 1963. The Fort Wayne Village Elementary photos cover classes from 1975-77 and the New Haven Village Elementary cover classes 1969-1971.

    We have created a new North Side High School page to launch the scrapbooks that we have been able to digitize, including art teacher Marjorie Bell’s scrapbooks covering 1952 to 1973, the Future Secretaries of America, 1980-1981, the 1977-1978 North Side 50th Anniversary Scrapbook, including the 1978 Blizzard Edition, and the North Side High School War Efforts 1942-1944. This site will soon also offer videos, so keep watching!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Online Family Resources

    Friday, May 20, 2016

    We are pleased to be able to post some new Family Resources for you to use.

    The first two written and donated by Patricia Johnson: Great Grandparents and Their Ancestors of (Ina) Patricia Hughes, 1928- , which is divided into seven parts, and Great Grandparents and Their Ancestors of Frank Lee Johnson, Jr., 1927- , which contains eight parts. Both are keyword searchable.

    We also have three letters of the Howard Family, DeKalb County, Indiana. The first, dated 1930, is from 11 year old Elton Howard, was written to his mother, Ester, and mailed in the first batch of air mail from Fort Wayne. It flew to Chicago and back, and was intended as a souvenir. The second is a 1919 letter to Elton’s father, Elton D., from his aunt Emma, who was visiting Danville, Indiana. The third letter, also to Elton, Sr., from Emma Howard, discusses various members of the extended family.

    The last is Thomas Middlebrook Willis, 1859-1937, Pioneer Abilene, Texas Attorney.  Thomas was born in 1859 in Georgia. His family migrated to Texas in 1866, then, after law school, he settled in Abilene, where he settled and his family grew. his descendant, T. Bradford Willis, DDS, of Waco, Texas, compiled this biography and has graciously allowed us to post it.

    Thanks to our contributors, who continue to make The Genealogy Center Free Databases a site worth visiting!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Free Family Resources

    Saturday, Apr 02, 2016

    We have some new family resources available for you to use!

     

    We have Documentation for Nancy Kerr/Carr (1809 to after 1838), donated by Curtis L. Older. Nancy was born in Ohio, migrating with her parents to Indiana where she married Thomas Gouty. She was the mother of Elias B. Gouty (1833-1915) and she died before 1840. This material provides information on her birth and married family, court cases and references to prove her lineage, and an SAR application by Curtis Lynn Older. This is an excellently researched proof document!

     

    Pragoff Progenitors: Rogers Line, Lewis Extensions, compiled by Eleanor Trapnell Kloman Wallace, deals extensively with the Rogers family of Virginia and Kentucky, adding to her works that deal with other Pragoff progenitors, including the Gorin and Franklin families.

     

    The Robert Laurie Lamont Bible includes both images and transcriptions of the Robert Laurie Lamont-Susanna Aikins family covering 1835 to 1989, from Scotland to Iowa.

     

    And the Tremper Family Bible also includes images and a transcription of the Allan Tremper-Martha Bell Hilts family from 1832 to 1920 in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    Thanks to the donors for contributing these great resources!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • More Free Indiana Databases

    Friday, Mar 18, 2016

     We’ve added, and added to, a couple of Indiana free databases recently!

    The years of 1917-1919 and 2014 have been added to “Obituaries from the Sullivan Daily Times and the Sullivan Union, Sullivan County, Indiana,” compiled by Donna K. Adams, Paula Jewell, and Mark Brown of the Sullivan County Public Library Genealogy/Local History Department, who have generously shared this index with us. To use this collection, one can select the year of death, then locate the obituary by the first letter of the last name.

    We have the 1920 booklet of the Constitution and Bylaws of the Kenner Rebekah Lodge, IOOF, for DeKalb County, which lists duties and responsibilities of all officers.
     
    Finally, we have the Index to Springfield Township: A History (Franklin County, IN). We have Springfield Township: A History in our collection under call number GC 977.201 F85dua, and this index, compiled by Karen Coffinbarger of the Brookville Library, for the publication by Don Dunaway, will make use easier for all who wish to use it.

    Thanks to everyone who contributed to these databases!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New in Our Military Heritage!

    Tuesday, Mar 15, 2016

    We have added three new items to Our Military Heritage recently!

    From the Civil War, we have the military records of James Bigelow, 8th and 11th Connecticut. This packet includes all types of forms and certificates from his induction into the 8th Connecticut to his discharge, and includes information on his service as an assistant surgeon, his Master Mason certificate and his widow’s affidavit. We also have “Roster of the Eighth Regiment Conn. Vols. 1861-1865,” published in 1908. It includes names of all members, by company, who attended a reunion that year, including Dr. James Bigelow of Elkhart, Indiana.
     
    The other item is a clipping from the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, published in about December 1988, concerning the sad fate of World War II veteran Roland Boyle. Local boy Roland served in the Civilian Conservation Corps before joining the army in 1940, serving until the end of the war. Back in Fort Wayne, he had difficulty adapting to civilian life and eventually left his parents and siblings for a rootless existence in the west. He died in 1987 and was buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of Arizona in Phoenix, although his family was not aware of his death for a year. This article is illustrative of the difficulties all soldiers faced when returning from war.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • More Free Allen County Online Resources

    Friday, Mar 11, 2016

    Our Allen County Resources have grown recently with additions to a couple of pre-existing databases and a couple of new sources as well.

    We have City of Fort Wayne Water Works, 1931-1981, with a history of the Water Works and the St. Joseph Pumping Station, with Three Rivers Filtration Plant Functions, a nifty flow diagram and some great photographs!
     
    Speaking of great photos, we have the Embassy Theatre Commemorative Photographs, 1928-1978, with a history of the theater and wonderful photos of the Embassy and of its incarnation as the Emboyd Theatre.
     
    We also have a copy of the Washington Township (Allen County, IN) School yearbook, “The Wildcat” for 1957-1958. “The Wildcat” includes individual photos for each student and teacher from kindergarten to eighth grade, and group photos for sports, yearbook staff, etc. Since this belonged to a student, there are even a few autographs.
     
    Additions to the Lindenwood Cemetery Index for 2015 have been added. Lindenwood is one of the oldest and largest cemeteries in Allen County and is on the National Register.
    2015 Addition to Lindenwood burials

    Finally, 62 new booklets and documents comprising more than 1400 images have been added to the General Electric Collection in the Elex section. As one of Fort Wayne’s largest employers in the 20th century, this collection is a tremendous addition to our local history.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New Family Resources

    Tuesday, Feb 09, 2016

    A few new Family Resources have appeared on our Free Databases lately!

    Genealogical Research of Tyler Calhoun, Jr., Ida Calhoun Burritt, and Ida Calhoun Scott begins with Hugh Calhoun, born at sea in route to the United States in 1789. He and his family lived in York County, Pennsylvania, Montgomery County, Ohio, and Wabash County, Indiana and continues through seventeen generations with approximately two thousand individuals.

    The William Adelbert Craker Diaries covers family and neighbors in Leelanau County, Michigan from 1919 to 1952, concentrating on daily activities and neighbors’ lives and deaths.
     
    Our Parks Family in America: Joseph and Ruth Parks of East Tennessee and Their Descendants is available through the generosity of Janet Bliss Parks, and includes photos, an every name index as well as a general index of churches, cemeteries, companies, geographic places and  more.
     
    Rhodes Family History was generously donated by Robin Rhodes and includes Rhodes, Ayres, Weiss, Patterson, McDuffie, Stallard, Williams, Teeter, Robinson Nellans, Hibray, Clifton, Percell, Weaver, Rutledge, Richards families. One can read through the various sections or do a search by first or last name, birth, christening, death or burial place, or spouse’s name.
     
    Treece and Related Families includes 40 years of research by Mary Lou Treece Cless special emphasis on the Treece family. It also concentrates on the surnames Place, Hicks, Coleman, French, Thrapp, Patee, Pattee, Riggenbach, and Blunier.

    Lastly is an update to Michael Clegg’s Kincaid Family File. We thank all of these researchers and authors for their contributions.


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • New in Our Military Heritage

    Saturday, Feb 06, 2016

    We have a number of new records on Our Military Heritage to share with you.

    Dennis McClurg has transcribed the Civil War letters of Sgt. Isaac McFadden. McFadden was born in 1834 in Ohio, but moved with his family to Wabash County, Indiana, where he attended school with Samuel Ferguson and his sister, Martha. Isaac was living in St. Louis and courting Martha through the mail, though she was also interested in other young men, when Isaac and Samuel joined the 101st Indiana Infantry. Isaac was with Samuel when the latter died of disease in 1863. A few months later, Isaac died at Chickamauga and is buried in Chattanooga. During this time, the letters Isaac sent to Martha were detailed, illustrating a soldier’s life and mentions mutual acquaintances. This database includes both scans of the original letters and transcriptions for Isaac’s letters to Martha and others. Thanks to Dennis McClurg for this fabulous source.
     
    Born in Ireland in 1873, Michael Joseph O’Brien joined his brother in America in 1896, and joined the Ninth U.S. Infantry later that same year. He served in the Spanish American War in Cuba, the Philippine Insurrection, the Boxer Rebellion in China, and later in the Texas-Mexican border conflict. He left the Ninth to become a first lieutenant during World War I. Michael Joseph O'Brien of Bartoose, Ireland and Sackets Harbor, New York: an Irish Immigrant's Odyssey tells Michael’s story and was donated to us by the author Stephan P. Clarke, who had generously allowed us to post it.
     
    Stephen Clarke has also allowed us to post his work about his uncle, Paul S. Grieb with the 709th Tank Battalion in World War II. This item includes a biography of Paul Grieb, along with a calendar of movements of the 709th Tank Battalion and its activities, notes about the Battle of the Huertgen Forest, and other documents Grieb collected during the war.
     
    We Too Were There: Company C, 353rd Infantry is a company history written by Sgt. Ralph Brach and illustrated by Captain Clarence Hughes. It is a history of the company written shortly after the war and includes memorial and awards list and a directory of all of the unit members.

    We also have the autobiographical work The Unique Navy Career of Sheldon H. Hine, Lt. Comdr., U.S.N.R. 1942-1948. This Fort Wayne resident worked with the Special Devices Division of the Bureau of Aeronautics and his story is fascinating.World War II

    Last but not least is the file that contains George V. Myers’ World War II discharge papers and oral interview. Myers, of Michigan, served in the 353rd Infantry and served in Europe and Africa as a military Policeman. Take a bit of time and have a listen!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Starting the Collection: Two Great Hoosiers!

    Thursday, Dec 17, 2015

    by Delia

    People are already sending photos for the Who’s a Hoosier? Who and What Makes Indiana Great Bicentennial Image Collection. This one comes from Kevin Roe of Fort Wayne. Kevin has lived most of his life in Fort Wayne. Some of us here in The Genealogy Center knew him as an Allen County Public Library Page-turned Clerk-turned Librarian in the 1970s and 1980s as he worked his way through college and graduate school, then began his career. He’s now with Fort Wayne Community Schools, but keeps in touch with us. Kevin is sending a number of family and group photos, but this one shows Kevin (a great Hoosier) with Santa in 1963, when Kevin was 3½ years old.

    This Santa is Phil Steigerwald, the famous Wolf & Dessauer Santa Claus. Born in 1927 to Phil E. and Vera Hurst Steigerwald, Phil began his Santa career in 1943, when he was still in high school. In the mid-1950s, his service became a profession at the Sears Store on Rudisill. He became Wolf & Dessauer’s Santa several years later and remained there until W&D closed in 1979. Along the way, he was a realtor and a Fort Wayne City Council member from 1963 to 1971. Phil died in 2004, but his legacy lives with the many children who still treasure their pictures with Santa.

    Join us in defining Who's a Hoosier? Who and What Makes Indiana Great by submitting images for the collection!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Brethren Additions to Our Free Databases

    Monday, Dec 14, 2015

    It is a wonder how one person's contributions to our Free Databases can expand research possibilities! The following material has all been donated for your use here by one generous researcher.

    The Four Mile Church was the first Church of the Brethren (German Baptist) in Indiana. It was 1809 and the area was known as “The Gore.” The Upper Four Mile Church was in Wayne County, and the Lower Four Mile Church was in Franklin County, but when Union County was formed in 1821, both churches were in that county. Four Mile Church, 200th Anniversary discusses the history of the church with brief family histories of members, along with many photos, and a map showing the locations of early Brethren Churches in Indiana.

    Virginia Colony: History and Record of the Early Families and Times of the Four Mile Church of the Brethren is a history of the church and area, along with family histories and a name index to this material. Together, these two items provide  a wonderful history of the church and its people.
     
    The Frontier Brethren provides a study of the early migration of the Brethren to Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley. It contains historical and biographical material, as well as a map of Brethren churches in Kentucky, and southern Indiana and Ohio.
     
    Southern Ohio, Highland and Adams County Churches also deals with Brethren churches, this time on Ohio. A history of the Church in that region is accompanied by an index of Dunkard families listed in the 1820 and 1830 census of the area.
     
    Obannon Baptist Brethren Church book deals with the Brethren who came to Ohio in the 1790s, and provides a history and information on the families.  
     
    All of these were generously provided by Merle Rummel and all can be searched using the search feature on each home page.

    The last item, also provided by Mr. Rummel, is Brethren Migration Roads, a PowerPoint file that is not searchable, but contain 264 images that include maps and photographs of the trails as they exist now and images of what might have existed when our ancestors traversed these routes. Whether your ancestors were Brethren or not, this final selection is a wonderful resource.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center