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  • More Evangelical Messenger Obituaries Indexed!

    Sunday, Jul 26, 2015

    One of the most popular of our Free Databases is the Evangelical Messenger Obituary Index, and recently another year, 1944, has been added to this collection. Thanks to the efforts of distant volunteer Anne Dallas Budd, there are 190,775 entries. The "Evangelical Messenger" was the English-language, weekly denominational publication associated with The Evangelical Church, and served a community of subscribers across many states. From this website, you can search for names, or browse through a chronological list of deaths. And remember, contact us with a list of obituary copies you’d like to obtain, provide your mailing address and, within a couple of weeks, we will send copies along with a bill for $2.50 per obituary. Check the index today!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Ohio & Indiana African-Americans in the Maumee Valley

    Thursday, Jul 23, 2015

    Join us on Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at 7PM in Meeting Room A for the Maumee Valley Heritage Corridor’s “Layers of History.” Angie Quinn will focus on the Wren and Little Africa communities in Van Wert County, Ohio, the former Randolph family slaves in Darke and Mercer County, Ohio, and communities in Whitley County, Indiana, and Paulding, Ohio. Curt Witcher and Roberta Ridley will share "how-to" information about performing research using census data, government land office records, and other resources. John Aden, PhD, from the Fort Wayne African/African-American Historical Society Museum will provide some artifacts and collection items used by early rural African American residents in our region. Mark your calendar for this great program on the history and people of the Maumee River Valley!


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • One-on-One Consultations for August

    Thursday, Jul 23, 2015

    Have a brick wall in your research? Would you like a greater understanding of some aspect of your research? The Genealogy Center is offering 30-minute personal research consultations with a staff member on some troublesome aspect of your research on Wednesday August 19th and Tuesday August 25th, from 2PM to 4PM, in The Genealogy Center. Call 260-421-1225 or email Genealogy@ACPL.Info for an appointment, providing basic information concerning the nature of your quandary. A staff member will be assigned and a time established for your consultation. Be sure to bring your research notes to your consultation.

    Space is limited, and pre-registration is required. Register today!

     To register, call 260-421-1225 or send us an email.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Beyond the Family Bible: Making the Most of Family Heirlooms and Artifacts in Genealogy Research

    Monday, Jul 20, 2015

    John Beatty will be presenting "Beyond the Family Bible: Making the Most of Family Heirlooms and Artifacts in Genealogy Research" on Tuesday September 15, 2015, at 1:00 p.m. in the Globe Room of the Main Library. The program will discuss how to analyze a variety of inherited items - books, textiles, photographs, jewelry, paintings - and how they can aid in doing genealogical research. Often there are clues imbedded in such items that researchers can use to their advantage if they know where and how to look. The talk will also discuss a variety of printed sources for heirloom evaluation.

    This lecture is part of “A Heritage of Needle Art,” sponsored by the Fort Wayne Area Embroiderer’s Guild, an exhibition that honors embroidery, in all its shapes and traditions, as a timeless and enduring expression of art. A sampling of historic needle art, on loan from the Embroiderers’ Guild of America’s Permanent Collection in Louisville KY, will be on display. Items selected for exhibition will represent a wide variety of embroidery techniques as well as cultural needle art traditions from all over the world. Highlighting the exhibit will be a 6' x 6' military insignia designed and embroidered by Master Sergeant Edward Kuhn in the early 1900. Kuhn used 800 skeins of silk and stitched the tapestry over a period of 14 years. The Exhibit Opening is on Friday, August 21 at 6:00pm in the Jeffrey R. Krull Gallery, Allen County Public Library, with a program on Sergeant Edward C Kuhn, Master Sergeant and Master Embroiderer, at 7:00 pm in the Globe Room, presented by Jeffrey Krull, retired Director of the Allen County Public Library and descendant of the creator of the exhibited Tapestry of the Insignia of the United States.


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • If You Are Only Browsing & Not Using the Catalog, You Might Be Missing Things!

    Friday, Jul 17, 2015

    By Dawne

    In The Genealogy Center’s previous incarnation on this site, most books in the collection were in “closed stacks.” That meant that patrons looked in the card catalog under the county name where their ancestors lived to identify books they wanted to see, and then put a call slip for each one into a tray. The call slip included the book’s call number and the patron’s seat number. Library staff called “pages” brought the books to the patron’s seat.

    Fast-forward to 2003, when the library moved temporarily to Renaissance Square a few blocks away during the Big Remodel. Suddenly there was enough room for books in Genealogy to be open-stack and patrons could browse! And virtually all of The Genealogy Center’s materials have been open-stack ever since.

    Being able to browse the stacks is mostly a good thing. We used to find that some of the established subject headings in the old catalog could be a bit misleading from the patron’s standpoint. The one that always comes to mind is “Registers of births, etc.” This subject heading was arbitrarily assigned to any book that had birth information in it. Many patrons submitted call slips for books they found with this subject heading, thinking they were requesting a birth records index. They didn’t realize that the card they saw was a subject card, not a title card, and that books with this subject heading did not necessarily pertain to birth records at all! In many cases, the book they received would be a cemetery transcription book.

    But there are also reasons that checking the catalog and not relying solely on browsing should be done. I will give you two examples:
    •    Family histories – You can browse by surname to look for published family histories on your surnames of interest. It is very convenient since they are arranged on the shelves in the Family History Room alphabetically by the main family name in the volume. The key word here is “main family,” however. Most published family histories include more than just one surname. Our catalogers have examined each book and cross-referenced it under other surnames that feature significantly. Sometimes this includes dozens of names in a single book – and that book is only shelved alphabetically under the one name. What if the name in which you have interest is one of the others? Search the catalog using the terms “Surname family” (with quotation marks, putting the actual name in place of the word surname) to identify books you might be missing by browsing.
    •    At the beginning of each state section in The Genealogy Center are any books that have a statewide or regional focus, or cover more than one or two counties in a single volume. This statewide section is followed by a section of books for each county in the state, alphabetically. If you are browsing the section of books for the county in which you have interest but have skipped over the state section, you might be missing some valuable material. One example: The Mid-Michigan Genealogical Society in Lansing published a series of “Occasional Papers.” Because these are a set, they are filed in the statewide books at the beginning of the Michigan section. However, these are not all statewide books. No. 10 is Abstracts of the Early Probate Records of Ingham County, Michigan, 1838-1869 (GC 977.4 M59 No. 10). If you browse in the Ingham County section without checking the catalog, you might never know The Genealogy Center has this volume of probate abstracts.

    All library catalogs are different. If you visit many libraries to do research, it can seem like a hassle to have to learn each system, particularly if the collection’s books are open-stack and arranged in a logical way. It can be tempting to just browse. But I would encourage you to do some catalog searching as well, just to be sure you don’t overlook something vital to your research.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Early African-American Settlers of the Maumee Valley on July 28th

    Monday, Jul 13, 2015

    Mark your calendar for an informative evening on Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at 7PM in Meeting Room A as Angie Quinn will discuss the Maumee Valley Heritage Corridor’s “Layers of History,” while Curt Witcher, and Roberta Ridley will share "how-to" information about performing research using census data, government land office records, and other resources. John Aden, PhD, from the Fort Wayne African/African-American Historical Society Museum will provide some artifacts and collection items used by early rural African American residents in our region.

    For more information, see Early African-American Settlers of the Maumee Valley. Join us for this free event!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Beyond Just Starting Your Family History

    Saturday, Jul 11, 2015

    So, we've covered some of the basic records that you will use to start your family history, but what's the next step? Join us for "Beyond Just Starting" on Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 9:30A in Meeting Room C to learn how to verify the information you find, and the importance of documenting what you find and where you found it. Discover how to harvest as much information as possible from various records. We will also show you how to use the free FamilySearch website, and provide a virtual tour of The Genealogy Center’s licensed databases. For more information, see brochure. To register for this free event, call 260-421-1225 or send an email.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • We're Closed But We Miss You!

    Saturday, Jul 04, 2015

    by Delia

    Yes, The Genealogy Center is closed for three days this Fourth of July weekend. The plan to be closed for three day straight was made before the decision was made to begin open hours on Sundays this summer. It was decided that we would be closed in observance of the Fourth on Friday July 3rd, then closed on July 4th as well. When Sunday hours came up, I think the decision was made that we would remain closed on Sunday July 5th because we were all excited about a three day weekend.

    So, yes, we relish our extra days of being closed and being off (no, no extra paid holidays) when family members are visiting and celebrating, and that extra sleep the day after all of the fireworks, whether you attend a show or just hear your neighbors shooting them off in their driveways, will be appreciated. But don’t think that we won’t miss you!

    For me, and I believe all of my colleagues here at The Genealogy Center, the best part of the job is hearing your research tangles and trying to figure out one more place to search for the information you need. One more way to figure out what happened to the man who went missing. One more idea on how to find that woman’s parents. One more notion of what happened to all of the children after their parents died. These are the human stories that drew us to our own family history in the first place, so we understand the desire to search and the satisfaction of finding answers that seemed out of reach.

    So enjoy the holiday! If you gather with family or friends, ask them to share their own memories. Even children have memories of past holidays and gatherings, and sharing memories may engender within them an interest in becoming part of the chain of family historians.

    We’ll see you on Monday, to start the search anew.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Additions to Family Files and Resources

    Wednesday, Jul 01, 2015

    A few more family resources were posted to the Free Databases that might provide some clues for family historians.

    The first is the Hut Family Bible Transcription. The original Bible is now lost to this branch of the family, who do, however, own and shared an English translation of the German content written by Theodore Henry Hut, the eldest child of Ludwig and Addelhia Brandt Hut. The couple, Theodore and another, child, Johanna, came of the United States from Germany in 1837, and settled in Ohio. The Bible record is in narrative form and follows the Theodore, his parents, three wives and children through births, marriages and deaths. The item is truly a valuable document for the family and we are pleased it was shared with us, and you.

    The next item, transcribed and donated by Martha Bowes, is the Autobiography of Jane Ivison Scott Hanna, born about 1810 in Scotland and died in 1891 in Indiana. This account is dated 1877 and provides a fascinating look at her life before and after immigration.

    Shelley Cardiel found and “rescued” three photographs of the some of the children of Nicholas and Rosa Bauer Plain of Atlanta, Indiana. Ms. Cardiel also provided identifying information about the family through census and cemetery records, adding to the value of these photos.

    Barbara McCoy donated a copy of a family group record for the John Monroe Kirk family of Pennsylvania and Indiana, as well as an extended family photo taken in celebration of John’s 75th birthday in 1905. The photo features the descendants of John’s father and uncle, Jesse and Alexander Kirk.

    And last, Ms. McCoy also donated a family group record and family photos of Joseph Ray Guernsey and Flora Anderson Phrall, also of Indiana. There are several World War I photos of Joseph Ray, including one with a group of other (unfortunately unidentified) servicemen at Fort Dix in 1918. Take a look and see if you can identify any of the other men.

    We are very appreciative to be allowed to post these images, and welcome any that others may wish to contribute!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • More Free Military History Sources

    Sunday, Jun 28, 2015

    Several new items have been added to Our American Heritage recently that you might want to peruse. The first is a photograph of the tombstone of Henry F. Frizzell, Civil War Medal of Honor recipient. Along with the photograph is a link to the U.S. Army Center of Military History for brief biographies of Frizzell and other Medal of Honor winners.

    Also uploaded recently were video interviews with a number of Twentieth Century servicemen and their families including  Don Theurer, World War II Army Air Corps; Vicki Khouli, Ominous Odyssey from World War II; Korean War Veteran Chuck Layton; Vietnam War sailor Dana Failor; Vietnam War Marine Bob IhrieBernie Lee, 22-Year Marine Corps Veteran;  Phil Plasterer, 82nd Airborne during the Afghanistan and Iraqi Wars; and an interview with Gerard Willis of the Allen County Council of Veterans. These are a fascinating look at big wars from front lines perspectives.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Closed July 3rd through 5th

    Thursday, Jun 25, 2015

    The Genealogy Center, like the rest of the Allen County Public Library facilities, will be closed Friday July 3rd through Sunday July 5th in observance of the Fourth of July holiday. We will reopen with out regular hours on Monday, July 6th. Enjoy the holiday and then get back to your research!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Our First Free Database for North Carolina

    Wednesday, Jun 17, 2015

    We now have twenty-six states covered in our Free Databases with the recent addition of an occupational association program for North Carolina. Although the four page program of the 1935 North Carolina State Association of Colored Graduate School Nurses is small, it contains the names of about three dozen people who were involved with the Association or with the meeting that was held on June 6th and 7th at the First Baptist Church of High Point, North Carolina. Talks included “Surgical Technique,” by Miss M. R. Searcy and a case study by Miss M. K. Long of the State Hospital. Other activities included a garden party on the lawn on June 6th and a sightseeing tour followed by a dance on June 7th. This is a wonderful source for anyone searching African-American professionals in the mid-1930s.


    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Juneteenth Celebration

    Monday, Jun 15, 2015

    The Allen County Public Library is pleased to welcome Dr. Edna Greene Medford of Howard University for a Juneteenth presentation Friday, June 19, at 7 p.m. Dr. Medford will speak on “When Freedom Came: Emancipation and the Question of Timing.” The lecture will be in the Main Library Theater on Lower Level 2 and is free and open to the public.

    June 19, 2015, is the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth, the first known celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. The event took place in Texas when Union soldiers arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865, and told residents that the war was over and the slaves were free.[1]

    Dr. Medford will discuss the various dates to be considered for the celebration of enslaved people gaining their freedom – January 1, 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation; June 19, 1865, when word finally reached far-flung Texas; or December 6, 1865, when the requisite number of states ratified the Thirteenth Amendment, abolishing slavery. Dr. Medford is an author, an instructor on African American history, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and 19th century America, and a member of the Board of Advisors of the Lincoln Forum. She received a 2009 bicentennial edition of the Order of Lincoln from the State of Illinois for her study of Lincoln and the Civil War era.Join us for this special presentation sponsored by the Allen County Public Library!


    [1] Juneteenth.com, “History of Juneteenth,” www.juneteeth.com/history.htm. Accessed 12 June 2015.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Fort Wayne Church Scrapbooks Available Online

    Sunday, Jun 14, 2015

    Two local churches have allowed us to scan and post their scrapbooks to our Free Databases page. Included are three scrapbooks from First Baptist Church and five scrapbooks from North Christian Church, both from here in Fort Wayne.

    The First Baptist Scrapbooks contain all types of church activities and news from 1949 to 1995, including selected members’ obituaries and wedding announcements, bulletins and photographs. The North Christian Scrapbooks also contain bulletins, photos, accounts of various church activities and news items pertaining to the church or to its members. Although the scrapbooks are not indexed, the contents listings for each of these eight scrapbooks will provide a valuable guide to anyone searching for news or members of these churches.

    Thank you to these two churches for allowing us to make these great resources available!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Death-related Sources added to Free Databases

    Thursday, Jun 11, 2015

    To start off with one of our most popular databases, the Evangelical Messenger Obituary Abstracts database just keeps growing, and now covers 1848 to 1943 with a total of 188, 555 entries thanks to Anne Dallas Budd, Rita Bone Kopp and Sally Zody Spreng.

    A collection of Obituaries from the Sullivan Daily Times and the Sullivan Union, Sullivan County, Indiana have been added to the Free Databases. Consisting of more than 17,000 images, this material covers many of the years from 1920-2013. These records were compiled by Donna K. Adams, Paula Jewell, and Mark Brown of the Sullivan County Public Library Genealogy/Local History Department, who have kindly allowed us to post them.

    Jim Cox has again donated Jay County, Indiana cemetery records for our Free Databases page. Hillside Cemetery and seventeen other small cemeteries (Bear Creek, Holy Trinity, Mt. Vernon, New Mt. Pleasant, Pleasant Hill, Praise Chapel, Sager, Springhill, Stephen, Stevenson, Stratton, Wayman, Wells, Wentz, Whaley, Whicker, Whiteman).

    From Noble County,Indiana, we have posted 281 images from the Oak Park Cemetery Record Book and 2681 records of Oak Park Cemetery burial permits. These records  include Potter’s Field entries and a cemetery map.

    And the Genealogy Tracers of Cleveland, Ohio (Alfreda Spratlen Barnes, Clancy Ware-Simpson, David Simpson, Carmine Vaughn Stewart, Gwendolyn Wynne Strayhan, and Henrietta English-West) have provided an additional 357 memorials consisting of 1661 images of Homegoing Programs and Memorials.

    We are fortunate that all of these great people are doing this wonderful work of preserving various death-related records and making them available to anyone through our Free Databases.

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Think of Us Before You Move....

    Thursday, May 28, 2015

    by Delia

    How many times have you moved in your life? Not counting the multitude of trips to and from my college town, and the moves between residence halls and apartments there, I have changes towns seven times in my life, and within those towns my family moved from one residence to another an additional nine times. At every move, we had to dispose of a lot of unnecessary items before moving. Old furniture, clothes or small appliances might go to a charity organization, but many broken-beyond-repair items and other junk ended up in the alley awaiting the garbage truck.
     
    Why am I sharing these memories? Because sometime in the future, you, too, may make a move. You, too, will go through your possessions, selecting what to take with you and what to jettison. Along with all of the other stuff that you’ve hauled from one abode to another or stored for years will be items that you hate to throw away, but know that, really, are not worth taking. These items could include church or association directories, military or family reunion programs and directories, and school directories or yearbooks.
     
    Stop! Don’t throw those items out! Send them to The Genealogy Center! We, as genealogists, examine city directories, pour over tax lists and pounce on lists of letters left at the post office, but forget that the records we so blithely think to discard could be valuable to future generations. So when you decide that you don’t need that high (or elementary) school annual, that homeowners’ association directory or those military reunion booklets, send them to us and we will be happy to have them as part of our collection. Contact us if you have questions.
     
    And remember that if you have friends, family members or neighbors that are clearing out their houses in preparation of a move, ask them to send that type of material to us instead of the putting them in the dumpster. One person’s trash is our collection’s treasure!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Join Us for the Global Family Reunion

    Thursday, May 21, 2015

    The Genealogy Center is partnering with Children’s Services and Young Adult Services to host a weekend full of family activities and events June 5-7 as a “branch party” of Global Family Reunion 2015! All activities will take place at the Main Library, 900 Library Plaza.

    Global Family Reunion will be Saturday, June 6, in New York City. The event, brainchild of author A. J. Jacobs, celebrates that we are all part of one big family – we are all cousins! The New York activities, including speakers, games, and other events, will take place on the grounds of the legendary 1964 World’s Fair, now home to the New York Hall of Science. Our local “branch party” will feature live streaming from New York on Saturday. Proceeds from ticket sales to the New York event will go toward finding a cure for Alzheimer’s Disease. Events at ACPL are free.

    Full details about local activities are available in the Global Family Reunion brochure. Besides other events, there will be three family photo opportunities:
    •    Have your family photo taken in The Great Hall and we will email you a copy
    •    Take a silly picture of your family with props in Children’s Services
    •    You Are (Were) Here – Take a photo in front of the green screen in Young Adult Services & we’ll superimpose it on a country of your ancestors’ origin

    In addition, bring heritage family photos and we will scan them, preserve them on our website, and email you a copy!

    There will be chess and board games in Young Adult Services noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, as well as outdoor games – bocce ball on Friday, cornhole on Saturday, and badminton on Sunday – on the Library Plaza!

    The Genealogy Center will present talks on Family History Fun, Ways to Display Your Family History Using Pinterest, Storytelling, Exciting Ways to Share Your Genealogy, and Being Creative … with Your Family History.

    There’s more! Keep watching this blog, The Genealogy Center’s website, our social media outlets and Genealogy Gems to learn times and days for various activities.
    GFRtree

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Start a Family History Journey -- This Summer!

    Thursday, May 07, 2015

    Congratulations! You’re on the road of family discovery, wanting to learn more about those that came before you. Maybe you have already started be trying Ancestry, or talking to relatives or maybe you are just curious about the paths you can take through the family trees. The Genealogy Center wants to help you navigate your journey with a series for the beginner – or for those who want to make sure they have the process well in hand. These 90-minute classes will be on the last Saturday of each month, June through September, so join us each month to find the route to your roots.

    The first session is “Beginning Your Family History Exploration” on Saturday, June 27, 2015, at 10:00A in Meeting Room A. Discover the basics of gathering information from your living relatives and family sources, and the importance of organization in the research process. A brief overview of what records you may discover in your search, and how they may be used to further your family story. We will also introduce you to Ancestry’s census collection and how to use it as a springboard to other records. Finally, take a tour of The Genealogy Center to familiarize yourself with what you can find.

    Next up on Saturday July 25, 2015 is “Beyond Just Starting,” at 9:30A in Meeting Room C. Learn how to verify the information you find, and the importance of documenting what you find and where you found it. Discover how to harvest as much information as possible from various records. We will also show you how to use the free FamilySearch website, and provide a virtual tour of The Genealogy Center’s licensed databases.

    The series will continue on Saturday August 29, 2015 and Saturday September 26, 2015, with “Following Up With More Records” and “Beginners Guide to Genealogical Software.” Mark your calendars now to attend!

    To register for these free events, call 260-421-1225 or send an email

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Open Sundays This Summer!

    Saturday, May 02, 2015

    In previous years, this is about the time we begin reminding all of our visitors that The Genealogy Center is closed on Sundays in the summer, but not this year! We are happy to announce that The Genealogy Center will be open our regular Sunday hours of 12 noon to 5 p.m. most Sundays this summer.

    We will be closed three Sundays this summer, however, all attached to holiday weekends: Sunday and Monday, May 24th and 25th, for the Memorial Day weekend; Sunday and Monday, September 6th and 7th for the Labor Day weekend; and three days for the Fourth of July weekend (Friday July 3rd, Saturday July 4th and Sunday July 5th). But that leaves twelve “extra” days to do research at The Genealogy Center!

    So make a weekend trip of your visit to Fort Wayne and The Genealogy Center!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center

  • Celebrate Juneteenth

    Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015

    On Friday, June 19, 2015, Dr. Edna Greene Medford, professor of history at Howard University, will present “When Freedom Came: Emancipation and the Question of Timing” addressing the issue of how we identify the arrival of African American freedom.  As Dr. Medford explains:

    Every schoolboy and girl knows that on January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln signed a proclamation declaring that all enslaved people in the states (or parts thereof) still in rebellion "are and henceforward shall be free." What happened after that is contested ground. We know that enslaved people experienced emancipation at myriad times and in myriad ways. Some were freed immediately; others were not freed until they exercised agency and fled the plantations; the vast majority awaited the arrival of federal military personnel. Even within certain states that had been visited by Union forces, knowledge of the proclamation did not reach all enslaved inhabitants swiftly or in any uniform way. How, then, do we determine the proper date to celebrate African-American freedom? My talk will consider the case for January 1, the date of the Emancipation Proclamation; June 19, or Juneteenth; and December 6, the date the requisite number of states ratified the Thirteenth Amendment.

    Dr. Medford teaches courses on African American history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and nineteenth-century America at Howard University. She is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on African Americans in the Civil War. Dr. Medford is a member of the Board of Advisors of the Lincoln Forum and a recipient of a 2009 bicentennial edition of the Order of Lincoln from the State of Illinois for her study of the Lincoln and the Civil War era.

    Click for more information. Join us on Friday, June 19, 2015 at 7 p.m. in the Main Library Theater!

    Posted by: ACPL Genealogy Center